Horses

Behavior
Retrospective evaluation of crib-biting and windsucking behaviors and owner-perceived behavioral traits as risk factors for colic in horses

Outcome: Cribbing/windsucking was significantly associated with colic but was unassociated with one category or severity of colic over another. No other repetitive behaviour was associated with colic. Age (> 20 years) was significantly associated with colic. An anxious temperament was not associated with risk of colic.

Impact of the study on quality of care: Animals at higher risk for colic may be identified based on history of cribbing/windsucking behaviour, but this behaviour was unassociated with increased risk for a particular category or severity of colic. Horses characterised as being more anxious were not at increased risk for colic. There is a need to elucidate a causal relationship between cribbing/windsucking and gastrointestinal function as development of more effective and humane strategies to treat cribbing/windsucking behaviour may help to improve equine welfare and reduce the risk of colic.

Publications: Malamed, R., Berger, J., Bain, M.J., Kass, P., & Spier, S.J. (2011). Retrospective evaluation of crib-biting and windsucking behaviours and owner-perceived behavioural traits as risk factors for colic in horses. Equine Veterinary Journal, 42(8), 686-92. (DOI:10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00096.x)

Eyes (Ophthalmology)
Survey of Ocular Lesions in Equine Neonates Presenting to Referral Centers

Outcome: Ophthalamic lesions were detected in 55.7% of neonatal foals with systemic disease. Acquired ophthalmic disease was more commonly detected than congenital ophthalmic disease. Foals with sepsis were more likely to have uveitis than were foals without sepsis.

Impact of the study on quality of care: A complete ophthalmic examination is indicated in neonatal foals evaluated for systemic disease.

Publications: Labelle, A.L., Hamor, R.E., Townsend, W.M., Mitchelle, M.A., Zarfoss, M.K., Breaux, C.B., Thomasy, S.M., & Hall, T. (2011). Ophthalmic lesions in neonatal foals evaluated for nonophthalmic disease at referral hospitals.  Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 239 (4), 486-92. (DOI:10.2460/javma.239.4.486)