Cats

Below, please find links to all of the clinical trials currently accepting feline patients. The studies are organized by discipline and include a multitude of information, including (but not limited to) the study’s purpose, benefits for participating, and financial incentive information.

Please contact the individual outlined at the end of each trial summary if you have any questions about the trial. 

Brain & Nervous System (Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Myasthenia Gravis: Understanding the Genetics

Title: MHC Haplotyping of cats with Acquired Myasthenia Gravis

Purpose of Study: Acquired myasthenia gravis is an immune mediated disease. In people, there is an association between genes (HLA DR3) and the myasthenia gravis. If the same is true in cats, it may allow us to identify cats at risk before the development of disease and develop new treatments. The purpose of this study is to determine if cats with acquired myasthenia gravis have a similar genes (MHC haplotype). We will use DNA collected from blood cells to do the genetic analysis.

Contact: Contact Dr. Vernau at (530) 304-9450 or kmvernau@ucdavis.edu.

Participation Requirements: Cats with a confirmed diagnosis of acquired Myasthenia Gravis.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: None.

Procedures: The only procedure involved is for the owner or referring veterinarian to submit a blood sample (at least 2 mls) in a small EDTA tubes.

Benefits: There is no direct benefit of this study for you or your cat; however, the information may allow us to identify cats that are at risk and develop new treatments.

Owner Responsibilities: The owner or referring veterinarian only needs to send in a blood sample that has been collected in a small EDTA tube by over-night FedEx, sent Monday to Thursday.

Cancer (Oncology)
Squamous Cell Carcinoma (Oral): Tumor Collection

Title: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Repository study

Purpose of Study: UC Davis is collecting oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma samples to populate a tissue bank for future research studies.

Contact: Please talk to your oncologist at the time of your cat's visit.

Participation Requirements: Cats with confirmed diagnosis of oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Cats with a confirmed diagnosis of oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma,

Procedures: After receiving consent from owners, a sample of the tumor is banked at the time of your cat's visit.

Benefits: There is no cost to the owner for participation in this study. The samples collected will be stored for future use of investigators with the ultimate goal of developing a treatment and prevention for the variety of cancers.

Owner Responsibilities: The owner only needs to consent to the sample being collected at the time of your cat's visit.

Variety of Tumors: Assessing Minimally Invasive Tumor Ablation

Title: Thermal ablation of cancer in dogs and cats

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of treating veterinary patients with minimally invasive tumor ablation technologies including cryoablation and microwave ablation. These methods are growing in the treatment of a variety of cancers in the human medical field, but information in veterinary patients is currently very limited. To date we have completed a study on cryoablation in nasal tumor patients, and this technique has been very successful in reducing tumor volume in nasal tumor patients – although there are no more spots in the formal nasal tumor study, because of this success, we continue to offer this technique as a clinical service to nasal cancer patients, and are expanding the types of cancer that we are evaluating.

Contact: Call 530-752-1393 and ask to speak to the Soft Tissue Surgery scheduling coordinators to schedule an appointment with Dr. Michele Steffey. The coordinators will likely advise you to send your pet's medical records and imaging results for Dr. Steffey's review. If, based on this information, your pet is deemed an appropriate candidate, an appointment will be scheduled.

Participation Requirements: In order to participate in this study, your pet must have **solitary** malignant soft tissue or bony mass **that is deemed amenable to ablation**. Tumor types that MAY be amenable to this treatment include lung tumors, kidney tumors, adrenal tumors, and bone tumors in certain locations. however determination of eligibility is complex and relates to the size of the lesion as well as proximity to/involvement of other important nearby structures. Tumors that are superficial (involving or near to the skin) or that involve the gastrointestinal tract are not amenable to this treatment.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Evaluation by the V.M.T.H. Small Animal Surgery, Internal Medicine, or Oncology services.

Procedures: If you agree to participate, under general anesthesia, ablation probes will be placed into your pet’s mass under ultrasound guidance and the tumor will be ablated.

Benefits: This treatment method may only be palliative, but it is our hope that in appropriately selected patients, we may improve quality of life as well as longevity.

Owner Responsibilities: The study will cover the cost of the ablation probes and generator. Costs of pre-operative workup, general anesthesia, recommended imaging, hospitalization, and general management of the disease process or any complications that occur during treatment are your responsibility.

Variety of Tumors and Diseases: Improving operative detection of tumors

Title: Fluorescent imaging of cancer

Purpose of Study: Near-infrared fluorescent imaging utilizes special wavelengths of light to identify important structures, and is used in surgery to improve surgical decision making. The fluorescent light is generated by a special contrast agent (a “fluorophore”) that is injected into the patient. When a special light source is used to illuminate the surgical site, any tissue in which this fluorophore is located will glow, aiding the surgeon in identifying the location or extent of disease. Based on early experiments in rodents and human clinical trials, this very sensitive tool has the potential to improve surgical decision-making and improve overall treatment for a wide variety of diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of this imaging modality in veterinary patients presenting with naturally occurring neuroendocrine tumors disease processes.

Contact: Call 530-752-1393 and ask to speak to the Soft Tissue Surgery scheduling coordinators to schedule an appointment with Dr. Michele Steffey.

Participation Requirements: Cats with the following conditions are most likely to benefit from this study: hyperparathyroidism, thyroid cancer, pancreatic cancer, adrenal cancer, thymoma, mammary (breast) cancer, lung cancer, anal sac gland cancer, oral cancer, mast cell tumor. Cats with severe kidney or liver disease are not eligible to participate.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Evaluation by the V.M.T.H. Small Animal Surgery, Internal Medicine, or Oncology services.

Procedures: If you agree to participate, the best fluorophore for your pet’s tumor will be administered or intravenously, at a dose and timing considered to be optimal by your attending veterinarian.

Benefits: It is hoped, but is not known if there will be a specific benefit to your individual pet. Fluorescent imaging may or may not improve operative localization and dissection of your pet’s tumor.

Owner Responsibilities: Costs of standard pre-operative workup, general anesthesia, recommended imaging, hospitalization, and general management of your pet’s disease process or any complications that occur during treatment are your responsibility. The cost of the fluorophore and special imaging is covered by the study. There are no risks associated with the imaging itself, as it only involves light; there is no radiation exposure to the patient. The fluorophores used in this study are FDA-approved for use in humans and have been used without complication in our hospital for the past 18 months. The primary risk of this procedure is associated with injection of these drugs is an allergic reaction, which is very rare, but unpredictable in an individual patient (like any other drug reaction, including antibiotics). If an allergic reaction should occur, immediate costs of treatment (immediate supportive medications, support of blood pressure) will be covered by the study; however, the owner will be responsible for any treatment costs for prolonged or severe complications.

Eyes (Ophthalmology)
Infection of the Cornea (Infectious Keratitis): Finding the Best Sample Collection Method

Title: Qualitative and quantitative effects of 0.5% proparacaine on corneal bacterial culture results in dogs, cats, and horses

Purpose of Study: If your veterinarian suspects that your cat is suffering from infectious keratitis (infection of the cornea) or a deep corneal ulcer, they will recommend taking a swab sample from the surface of your cat’s cornea to determine the type of infection. Historically at UC Davis, we have used a topical anesthetic named proparacaine, that is applied to the surface of the eye before any samples are taken to minimize discomfort. Recently, a concern has been raised that proparacaine may inhibit growth of infectious organisms in the laboratory after a corneal swab sample is obtained. This means that even if your cat has a corneal infection, we may not be able to grow the bacteria or fungi in the lab if proparacaine has been used before sample collection. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the best procedure to follow when collecting culture samples, thereby ensuring an appropriate diagnostic work up and treatment plan while minimizing discomfort.

Contact: Dr. Syndey Cartiff (sydney.cartiff@gmail.com or 530-601-7356)

Participation Requirements: Cats showing clinical signs of infectious keratitis

Initial Evaluation for Participation: None.

Procedures: After your cat is randomly assigned to one of two groups, a veterinarian will have a corneal sample taken from the affected eye of your cat twice. The first swab will be taken without a topical anesthetic and inoculated into a culture medium for analysis. Depending on the assigned group, your cat will then have either a drop of a sterile topical anesthetic (proparacaine) or sterile saline (i.e., no anesthetic) placed on to the surface of the affected eye. We will then swab the affected eye again for both groups as described above.

Benefits: You will be charged for the first culture (approximately $82) just as owners of animals not in the study would be charged. However, the study will cover all costs associated with the second culture collection.

Possible benefits include finding bacteria or fungi not routinely collected after use of a topical anesthetic, and helping to establish the best way to collect samples from future patients with infectious keratitis. Results of this study may be extrapolated to benefit human research as well.

Owner Responsibilities: You will be responsible for bringing your cat to the scheduled ophthalmology appointment and covering the cost for the first culture.

Printable Flyer (PDF)

Genetics
Feline Infectious Peritonitis in Any Breed

Title: Feline Infectious Peritonitis study

Purpose of Study: Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is an infectious disease that kills 1 in 100 to 1 in 300 of all cats in the U.S. However, the incidence is 5 to 10 times greater among young cats coming from catteries and shelters. It is a disease that is 100% lethal, and is heartbreaking for breeders and for the families that lose affected kittens and young cats. The purpose for this study is to find genetic markers to identify FIP susceptible cats and to use these markers to breed for resistance. In order to identify favorable or unfavorable genetic traits, we need to concentrate our studies on bloodlines within breeds of cats that are either inordinately susceptible or seemingly resistant. Such bloodlines exist in virtually all breeds of cats.

Contact: Contact the Community Medicine service at 530-752-9811 to make an appointment. For additional information, please visit the FIP webpage through the UC Davis Center for Companion Animal Health.

Participation Requirements:

  • Cats that have developed FIP, regardless of age
  • Healthy cats of any age that are close relatives (sire, dam, sibling) to cats that have developed FIP
  • Healthy cats of any age from bloodlines that have been so far free of FIP

Initial Evaluation for Participation: None.

Procedures: The only procedure involved is for the owner or referring veterinarian to submit a DNA sample and complete a questionnaire. Please visit the FIP webpage through the Center for Companion Animal Health for detailed procedures and instructions.

Benefits: There is no direct benefit of this study for you or your cat; however, the information may allow us to identify FIP susceptible cats and to use these markers to breed for resistance.

Owner Responsibilities: The owner or referring veterinarian needs to send in a DNA sample and complete the questionnaire. Please visit the FIP webpage through the Center for Companion Animal Health for detailed procedures and instructions.

Myasthenia Gravis in Any Breed

Title: MHC Haplotyping of cats with Acquired Myasthenia Gravis

Purpose of Study: Acquired myasthenia gravis is an immune mediated disease. In people, there is an association between genes (HLA DR3) and the myasthenia gravis. If the same is true in cats, it may allow us to identify cats at risk before the development of disease and develop new treatments. The purpose of this study is to determine if cats with acquired myasthenia gravis have a similar genes (MHC haplotype). We will use DNA collected from blood cells to do the genetic analysis.

Contact: Contact Dr. Vernau at (530) 304-9450, or kmvernau@ucdavis.edu.

Participation Requirements: Cats with a confirmed diagnosis of acquired Myasthenia Gravis.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: None.

Procedures: The only procedure involved is for the owner or referring veterinarian to submit a blood sample (at least 2 mls) in a small EDTA tubes.

Benefits: There is no direct benefit of this study for you or your cat; however, the information may allow us to identify cats that are at risk and develop new treatments.

Owner Responsibilities: The owner or referring veterinarian only needs to send in a blood sample that has been collected in a small EDTA tube by over-night FedEx, sent Monday to Thursday.

Internal Medicine
NEW! Fungal Disease: Examining a Treatment

Title: Voriconazole efficacy in cats with fungal disease

Purpose of Study: Voriconazole is a broad spectrum anti-fungal that is the treatment of choice for systemic aspergillosis in people and also used for variety of other fungal diseases. Drug treatment options in cats are limited because of little information of effect of anti-fungal medications on cats. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of voriconazole against serious systemic fungal diseases like aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, sporotrichosis, histopalsmosis and others.

Contact: Contact Dr. Polina Vishkautsan for details at pvishkautsan@ucdavis.edu or (530) 752-1393.

Participation Requirements: Cats with fungal disease that did not respond to existing anti-fungal options (e.g., fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B) or did not tolerate the adverse effects of the above-mentioned medications

Initial Evaluation for Participation: An appointment with the VMTH Internal Medicine service

Procedures: If you agree to let your cat participate in this study, the following will happen:

  • Your cat will be treated with voriconazole by mouth on day 1, and then again every third day.
  • On days 14, 30, 60 and 90 of treatment and then every 60-90 days until exit from study, we will do a physical examination and collect blood to measure voriconazole levels and test liver function.
    • NOTE: If your cat will require dose adjustments, he may need to be seen more frequently for blood sampling and rechecks.
  • We ask that you complete a monthly questionnaire and keep a journal to document any adverse effects that occur during the period of the trial.
  • In the unfortunate event of death, we will request that you will allow us to perform a necropsy of your cat (free of charge).

Benefits: We cannot promise any benefits to your cat or other animals from your taking part in this clinical trial; however, possible benefits include better disease outcome for your cat since voriconazole is a very efficacious and broad spectrum anti-fungal medication. Results from this study could lead to cats worldwide being treated with this medication.

Owner Responsibilities: If you allow your cat to participate in this study, you will be responsible for filling out a questionnaire once a month, recording all adverse effects in a journal, and keep all scheduled appointments. You will be responsible for covering all aspects of the care for your pet.

Ureteral obstructions: Evaluating Post-Surgery Outcomes

Title: Evaluation of Post-operative Outcome in Cats Undergoing Ureteral Stent Placement to Relieve Ureteral Obstruction

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this project is to record the intra-operative and postoperative complications associated with the procedure and determine the outcome of the procedure based on objective measures.

Contact: Contact Dr. Culp for details at wculp@ucdavis.edu or (530) 752-1393.

Participation Requirements: Cats with benign ureteral obstruction

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Contact Dr. Culp for details at wculp@ucdavis.edu or (530) 752-1393

Procedures: Cats with a diagnosis of benign ureteral obstruction will be enrolled in the study. Bloodwork values that can be utilized to determine the function of the kidney (should improve with the passage of urine) as well as variables such as the size of the kidney collecting system and ureter (should decrease with passage of urine) in cats both pre- and postoperatively will be evaluated. Lastly, the change in the urine output of cats with ureteral stents will be assessed to determine if the stents improve output.

Benefits: The benefits of enrolling a patient in this study are financial. Some of the pre- and post-stent placement bloodwork and pre- and post-stent placement ultrasound evaluations will be paid for by the study.

If this therapy proves to be beneficial, it will have important clinical applications for other cats with the same condition.

Owner Responsibilities: The owner is responsible for returning with their cat 2 weeks and 3 months after stent placement.

Variety of Tumors: Assessing Minimally Invasive Tumor Ablation

Title: Thermal ablation of cancer in dogs and cats

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of treating veterinary patients with minimally invasive tumor ablation technologies including cryoablation and microwave ablation. These methods are growing in the treatment of a variety of cancers in the human medical field, but information in veterinary patients is currently very limited. To date we have completed a study on cryoablation in nasal tumor patients, and this technique has been very successful in reducing tumor volume in nasal tumor patients – although there are no more spots in the formal nasal tumor study, because of this success, we continue to offer this technique as a clinical service to nasal cancer patients, and are expanding the types of cancer that we are evaluating.

Contact: Call 530-752-1393 and ask to speak to the Soft Tissue Surgery scheduling coordinators to schedule an appointment with Dr. Michele Steffey. The coordinators will likely advise you to send your pet's medical records and imaging results for Dr. Steffey's review. If, based on this information, your pet is deemed an appropriate candidate, an appointment will be scheduled.

Participation Requirements: In order to participate in this study, your pet must have **solitary** malignant soft tissue or bony mass **that is deemed amenable to ablation**. Tumor types that MAY be amenable to this treatment include lung tumors, kidney tumors, adrenal tumors, and bone tumors in certain locations. however determination of eligibility is complex and relates to the size of the lesion as well as proximity to/involvement of other important nearby structures. Tumors that are superficial (involving or near to the skin) or that involve the gastrointestinal tract are not amenable to this treatment.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Evaluation by the V.M.T.H. Small Animal Surgery, Internal Medicine, or Oncology services.

Procedures: If you agree to participate, under general anesthesia, ablation probes will be placed into your pet’s mass under ultrasound guidance and the tumor will be ablated.

Benefits: This treatment method may only be palliative, but it is our hope that in appropriately selected patients, we may improve quality of life as well as longevity.

Owner Responsibilities: The study will cover the cost of the ablation probes and generator. Costs of pre-operative workup, general anesthesia, recommended imaging, hospitalization, and general management of the disease process or any complications that occur during treatment are your responsibility.

Mouth (Dentistry & Oral Surgery)
Chronic Gingivostomatitis: Assessing the Immune Profile

Title: The immune profile of cats with Chronic Gingivostomatitis before and after full-mouth tooth extraction

Purpose of Study: Feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is a poorly defined, debilitating disease characterized by inflammatory lesion, mostly ulcerative or proliferative in nature, that affect the gums and the back of the mouth, and necessitates medical or surgical treatments, which include full-mouth extractions, antibiotic treatment, and corticosteroids. In-depth immune changes that occur in the body before and after extraction therapy are currently unknown. The purpose of this trial is therefore to understand the immune system of cats undergoing tooth extraction therapy, which will hopefully help us design new, less invasive treatment modalities.

Contact:  Boaz Arzi via phone (530-752-2470), fax (530-752-9620) or email (a href="mailto:dosclinicaltrials@ucdavis.edu">dosclinicaltrials@ucdavis.edu

Participation Requirements: Cats diagnosed with chronic gingivostomatitis that must undergo extractions therapy at the UC Davis Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service (DOSS).

Initial Evaluation for Participation: The cats will be evaluated by the Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service to assess eligibility to be enrolled in the study.

Procedures: The following procedures will be performed:

  • Collection of blood sample before treatment and then at 3 and 6 months after tooth extraction treatment. This sample will not be obtained if clinically contraindicated such as in patients with moderate or severe anemia (low numbers of red blood cells) or in patients that are dehydrated or have an impaired ability to clot their blood (coagulation or bleeding problems).
  • If your cat does not respond to the extractions therapy, opioid pain medication can and will be administered for the period of the study. Antibiotic therapy if needed can be administered; however, steroid or other immunosuppressive therapy will not be permitted. If you wish to give your cat any immunosuppressive therapy, we would need to exit your cat from the study.

Benefits: The study will cover all charges associated with participation, including the charges for blood work and recheck visits. The study will not cover the charges for the extractions, hospitalization and medication.

We cannot promise any benefits to your cat or other animals from your taking part in this clinical trial; however, possible benefits include better understanding of feline chronic gingivostomatitis that can hopefully lead to new designs for less invasive, more effective therapies.

Owner Responsibilities: Participation in this clinical trial will involve 3 visits over the course of 6 months, so you will be responsible for bringing your cat in for all study-related appointments.

Chronic Gingivostomatitis: Finding a Treatment with Stem Cells

Title: Fat-derived Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Therapy for Cats with Chronic Gingivostomatitis

Purpose of Study: Feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is a poorly defined disease characterized by inflammatory lesion, mostly ulcerative or proliferative in nature, affecting the gums and the back of the mouth. Moreover, FCGS is a painful and debilitating disease in cats that necessitates medical or surgical treatments. These include full-mouth extractions, antibiotic treatment, and corticosteroids. Recently, feline interferon treatment (currently unavailable in the USA) has been proposed for non-responsive stomatitis. However, none of these treatments are ideal, predictable and without possible complications. The quality of life to both pet and owner is significantly affected.

A form of stem cell therapy where stem cells are extracted from fat tissue has come to the forefront in recent years as a potential therapeutic option for chronic inflammatory diseases. This cell therapy may help to correct abnormalities of the immune system that may be involved with stomatitis in cats. Moreover, stem cells are shown to help in regenerating damaged tissues. Feline stem cells has shown to be easily generated in large quantities from a small amount of fat collected via minor surgical procedure but safely of systemic administration in cats was not reported previously.

In this study, our aim is to treat cats in which all current treatment modalities have failed and that have a poor quality of life. If the proposed stem cell treatment will prove to be beneficial, it may revolutionize the treatment options for cats with FCGS.

Contact:  Boaz Arzi via phone (530-752-2470), fax (530-752-9620) or email (a href="mailto:dosclinicaltrials@ucdavis.edu">dosclinicaltrials@ucdavis.edu

Participation Requirements:

  • Cats that had full-mouth extractions performed that have not resulted in a cure from the disease
  • Ineligible: Cats that did not have full-mouth extractions performed or have other concurrent systemic diseases

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Evaluation for eligibility by Dr. Boaz Arzi

Procedures: The following procedures will be performed:

  1. Collection of blood and urine for analysis before the treatment and at 4-6 recheck appointments
  2. Collection of fat tissue from under the skin via a small incision. The fat will then be processed and stem cells extracted.
  3. Two-weeks following collection of the fat tissue, we will administer the stem cells to the affected cats via intravenous administration. The treatment will need to be repeated one and two months after the first administration of stem-cells (2-3 treatments).
  4. Recheck appointment is required initially at 1 month intervals and later at 3 month. Blood sample will be collected and will not exceed 5 milliliters (1 teaspoon).

Benefits: The proposed treatment strategy could have beneficial effects that may change the quality of life of your cat. We will also perform blood and urine test at no costs to you at each visit during the study. You will not be charged for the biopsy of fat tissue, stem cell treatments, or rechecks or the administration of the stem cells. You will only have to pay for take home medication, such as pain medication, as needed.

If this study will prove to be beneficial, it will have important clinical applications for other cats with the same condition.

Owner Responsibilities: The owner only needs to bring the cats to the VMTH for fat collection and for the scheduled recheck appointments.

Printable Flyer (PDF)

Dental Disease: Assessing Better Diagnostics

Title: The diagnostic yield of dental radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography in cats with dental disorders

Purpose of Study: Because of the highly detailed images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are commonly used as diagnostic tools in human medicine with great success; however, these scans are only now being introduced to the veterinary field. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to establish CBCT scans as the ideal imaging modality for mesaticephalic and brachycephalic cats with dental disorders.

Contact: Dr. Peter Strøm in the Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service via phone (530-752-2470) or email (pcstroem@ucdavis.edu)

Participation Requirements: Cats diagnosed with dentoalveolar disease that are referred to or are currently being treated by the Dentistry and Oral Surgery service (DOSS) at the UCD Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH).

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Examination by DOSS

Procedures: As part of the diagnostic work-up, we will image your cat via CBCT scan under general anesthesia. The CBCT scan will be done during your scheduled appointment with DOSS.

Benefits: You will not be charged for the CBCT scan; however, you will be charged for the general anesthesia and dental treatment.

We cannot promise any benefits to your cat from your taking part in this clinical trial; however, we hope that this study will lead to better diagnostics techniques. This study may also benefit other species with the same condition in the future.

Owner Responsibilities: Participation in this study does not require any additional visits beyond your scheduled appointment with DOSS.

With the exception the CBCT scan, you will be responsible for bringing your cat to DOSS and paying for all other fees associated with your cat’s visit and treatment.

Root Canal Treatment: Evaluating the Outcome

Title: Outcome of orthograde root canal treatment in cats

Purpose of Study: Long-term evaluation of root canal treatments by evaluating the dental x-rays is essential to assess the appropriateness of this treatment modality in cats. In receiving care of a specialized nature such as root canal treatment, patients need and deserve treatment that meets the standard of care and this study will shine a light on the efficacy of such treatment if rendered. Although root canal treatment is commonly performed in dogs and humans with a high success rate, the purpose of this study to evaluate the success rate of root canal treatment in cats, as we believe this treatment is just as appropriate for cats and with a similar high success rate.

Contact: Erica or Megan in the Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service (530-752-2470)

Participation Requirements: Cats that have had a root canal treatment performed .

Initial Evaluation for Participation: None.

Procedures: Your cat will receive routine periodontal treatment under general anesthesia as part of the standard of care. While under anesthesia dental radiographs of the teeth of interest will be obtained.

Benefits: The study will cover the dental radiographs pertaining to the teeth of interest and the anesthesia to obtain those radiographs (induction plus the first 15 minutes). However, you will need to pay for any other charges estimated by the DOSS beyond that mentioned above.

We cannot promise any benefits to your cat or other animals from your taking part in this clinical trial; however, possible benefits include appropriate evaluation and treatment of the root canal procedure, along with diagnosis of other current dental or periodontal diseases.

Owner Responsibilities: You will be responsible for bringing your cat to the Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service (DOSS) and cover the costs of anesthesia for procedures related to the routine periodontal treatment (cleaning, extraction etc.), possible medications if needed, housing and recovery fee while at the hospital. You will not pay for dental radiographs necessary to evaluate the teeth of interest to the study, the initial induction fee for anesthesia and the time spend, obtained the dental radiographs, which is no more than 15 min.

Soft Tissue Surgery
Variety of Tumors: Assessing Minimally Invasive Tumor Ablation

Title: Thermal ablation of cancer in dogs and cats

Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of treating veterinary patients with minimally invasive tumor ablation technologies including cryoablation and microwave ablation. These methods are growing in the treatment of a variety of cancers in the human medical field, but information in veterinary patients is currently very limited. To date we have completed a study on cryoablation in nasal tumor patients, and this technique has been very successful in reducing tumor volume in nasal tumor patients – although there are no more spots in the formal nasal tumor study, because of this success, we continue to offer this technique as a clinical service to nasal cancer patients, and are expanding the types of cancer that we are evaluating.

Contact: Call 530-752-1393 and ask to speak to the Soft Tissue Surgery scheduling coordinators to schedule an appointment with Dr. Michele Steffey. The coordinators will likely advise you to send your pet's medical records and imaging results for Dr. Steffey's review. If, based on this information, your pet is deemed an appropriate candidate, an appointment will be scheduled.

Participation Requirements: In order to participate in this study, your pet must have **solitary** malignant soft tissue or bony mass **that is deemed amenable to ablation**. Tumor types that MAY be amenable to this treatment include lung tumors, kidney tumors, adrenal tumors, and bone tumors in certain locations. however determination of eligibility is complex and relates to the size of the lesion as well as proximity to/involvement of other important nearby structures. Tumors that are superficial (involving or near to the skin) or that involve the gastrointestinal tract are not amenable to this treatment.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Evaluation by the V.M.T.H. Small Animal Surgery, Internal Medicine, or Oncology services.

Procedures: If you agree to participate, under general anesthesia, ablation probes will be placed into your pet’s mass under ultrasound guidance and the tumor will be ablated.

Benefits: This treatment method may only be palliative, but it is our hope that in appropriately selected patients, we may improve quality of life as well as longevity.

Owner Responsibilities: The study will cover the cost of the ablation probes and generator. Costs of pre-operative workup, general anesthesia, recommended imaging, hospitalization, and general management of the disease process or any complications that occur during treatment are your responsibility.

Variety of Tumors and Diseases: Improving Operative Detection of Tumors

Title: Fluorescent imaging of cancer

Purpose of Study: Near-infrared fluorescent imaging utilizes special wavelengths of light to identify important structures, and is used in surgery to improve surgical decision making. The fluorescent light is generated by a special contrast agent (a “fluorophore”) that is injected into the patient. When a special light source is used to illuminate the surgical site, any tissue in which this fluorophore is located will glow, aiding the surgeon in identifying the location or extent of disease. Based on early experiments in rodents and human clinical trials, this very sensitive tool has the potential to improve surgical decision-making and improve overall treatment for a wide variety of diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of this imaging modality in veterinary patients presenting with naturally occurring neuroendocrine tumors disease processes.

Contact: Call 530-752-1393 and ask to speak to the Soft Tissue Surgery scheduling coordinators to schedule an appointment with Dr. Michele Steffey.

Participation Requirements: Cats with the following conditions are most likely to benefit from this study: hyperparathyroidism, thyroid cancer, pancreatic cancer, adrenal cancer, thymoma, mammary (breast) cancer, lung cancer, anal sac gland cancer, oral cancer, mast cell tumor. Cats with severe kidney or liver disease are not eligible to participate.

Initial Evaluation for Participation: Evaluation by the V.M.T.H. Small Animal Surgery, Internal Medicine, or Oncology services.

Procedures: If you agree to participate, the best fluorophore for your pet’s tumor will be administered or intravenously, at a dose and timing considered to be optimal by your attending veterinarian.

Benefits: It is hoped, but is not known if there will be a specific benefit to your individual pet. Fluorescent imaging may or may not improve operative localization and dissection of your pet’s tumor.

Owner Responsibilities: Costs of standard pre-operative workup, general anesthesia, recommended imaging, hospitalization, and general management of your pet’s disease process or any complications that occur during treatment are your responsibility. The cost of the fluorophore and special imaging is covered by the study. There are no risks associated with the imaging itself, as it only involves light; there is no radiation exposure to the patient. The fluorophores used in this study are FDA-approved for use in humans and have been used without complication in our hospital for the past 18 months. The primary risk of this procedure is associated with injection of these drugs is an allergic reaction, which is very rare, but unpredictable in an individual patient (like any other drug reaction, including antibiotics). If an allergic reaction should occur, immediate costs of treatment (immediate supportive medications, support of blood pressure) will be covered by the study; however, the owner will be responsible for any treatment costs for prolonged or severe complications.

If you cannot find what you are looking for, please email us or call (530) 752-5366.