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Ensuring Future Veterinary Leaders in Avian Health
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Dr. Arthur (Art) Bickford, recognized as one of the most renowned avian pathologists in the country, was instrumental in creating the avian residency program.
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The school's avian residency program is one of the few, but immensely critical, training grounds for veterinary leaders dedicated to safeguarding the poultry industry and public health. Americans buy more chicken and poultry products than any other food at the center of the plate. Chicken consumption has increased nearly every year since the mid 1960s, and per capita egg consumption is projected to reach 260 eggs this year.

Dr. Arthur (Art) Bickford, recognized as one of the most renowned avian pathologists in the country, was instrumental in creating the avian residency program. This unique two-year training program at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (CAHFS) has produce some of the most impactful and influential avian specialists in the world.

To honor his many accomplishments and ensure the future of this important program, the Arthur A. Bickford Avian Residency Program Endowment Fund was established. Dr. Bickford made tremendous contributions to the poultry industry during his career and played an important role in protecting public health. Notably, he serves as associate director of CAHFS, chief of the Turlock laboratory location and was at the forefront of identifying and diagnosing disease problem in poultry.

"Creating this residency is one of our finest accomplishments," Dr. Bickford said. "During my career I have tried to do my part in the areas of diagnostics, research, and innovation in this important industry."

CAHFS, one of the largest animal health laboratory systems in the nation, is the backbone of California's warning system to protect the health of the state's livestock and poultry. It operates in partnership with the California Department of Food and Agriculture, veterinarians, and livestock and poultry producers.

"We have found that the industry itself is very much dependent on having expert diagnosticians available in support of our global efforts," said Ron Foster, president and CEO of Foster Farms, Inc. "The avian residency program at UC Davis is essential to the poultry industry. We supported this endowment fund since it was a great opportunity to join together in ensuring that the need for trained diagnosticians in the industry is met for years to come."

For more information about contributing to the Arthur A. Bickford Endowed Avian Residency Program, please contact the Office of Development at (530) 752-7024.

Tranforming the Highest Standard of Care
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Devoted to her guinea pigs, Marcia Messmer wants them to receive the highest standard of care. That is why she routinely travels 100 miles from her home to the UC Davis veterinary hospital.
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Devoted to her guinea pigs, Marcia Messmer wants them to receive the highest standard of care. That is why she routinely travels 100 miles from her home to the UC Davis veterinary hospital. She seeks the best and most comprehensive care for her beloved companions and values the expertise of veterinarians here. As a philanthropic partner, Marcia supports the school so that we can continue unparalleled care and remarkable advances in veterinary medicine, helping her guinea pigs and other companion animals enjoy longer and healthier lives.

For more information about making a gift, please contact the Office of Development at (530) 752-7024.

Endowed Scholarship Honors Longtime Friend
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After losing her longtime friends and colleague, Jan Boynton felt the best way to honor her memory was to establish the R. Darlene Murphy Endowed Memorial Scholarship. During the 35 years they had worked as nurses at Stanford Hospital, they developed a close friendship and shared a joy in their pets.
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Jan Boynton treasures a photo of her longtime friend, R. Darlene Murphy.

After losing her longtime friends and colleague, Jan Boynton felt the best way to honor her memory was to establish the R. Darlene Murphy Endowed Memorial Scholarship. During the 35 years they had worked as nurses at Stanford Hospital, they developed a close friendship and shared a joy in their pets.

In the 1980s, Stanford launched a new emergency response effort, the 11 p.m. - 7 a.m. Crisis Team. Murphy, a nursing supervisor, thought Boynton would be a great crisis nurse. They talked about the possibility for a year -- how to best keep their friendship and not compromise their professional duties. Finally, Boynton agreed.

It turns out that their decision was a good idea. During their next 26 years on the Crisis Team, they shared many professional values--including attention to detail, life-long learning, continual improvement and excellence. In their personal lives, they cheered on one another's successes, provided assistance when needed and offered comfort in times of sorrow.

Boynton decided to retire in 2013; Murphy stayed for another year until becoming terminally ill. Saddened but reflecting on all the years, Boynton elaborated, "I had a very satisfying career at Stanford. Having Darlene as my boss had a lot to do with that. She taught me how to live well--to do what you can, with what you have, for as long as you can."

Over the years, their cats and dogs benefited from advances in veterinary medicine. Thus, Boynton decided a gift to the school would further these efforts. This scholarship will recognize outstanding veterinary students and help them to achieve their professional dreams.

For more information about making a gift, please contact the Office of Development at (530) 752-7024.

A Legacy of Dedication to Education and Animals
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Dr. Mary Silan Seawright was a longtime friend of the school of the Veterinary Medicine and an ardent supporter of veterinary education. As an elementary school teacher for over 50 years, she was passionate about students and the value of education.
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Mary Silan Seawright & Dr. Michael Kent

Dr. Mary Silan Seawright was a longtime friend of the school of the Veterinary Medicine and an ardent supporter of veterinary education. As an elementary school teacher for over 50 years, she was passionate about students and the value of education.

While sadly she passed away in 2014, Dr. Seawright's legacy will live through the Mary Silan Seawright Scholarship, which recognizes exceptional veterinary students interested in small animal medicine. Sixty-eight veterinary students have received scholarships since the fund was established in 1987.

One of the students honored was Dr. Michael Kent, who received the Seawright Scholarship in 1996. Dr. Kent has since become a member of the school's faculty as a radiation oncologist and the director of the Center for Companion Animal Health. He says, "I am very grateful to Mary for her scholarship award. She was truly a special person. Mary was extremely proud of all her scholarship recipients and kept letters she received from them over the years. She loved attending the school's annual awards ceremony and other events where her health allowed."

The endowed scholarship fund will continue to award scholarships in Dr. Seawright's name each year - making a difference in Dr. Seawright's name each year - making a difference for students as they pursue their dreams of becoming veterinarians. She will be fondly remembered in the hearts of the many students she taught, the veterinary students she supported, and those who are honored in the future.

Dr. Seawright also made an impact on advancing animal health through other gifts to the school. She generously contributed funds to support cancer research and the construction of the Center for Companion Animal Health building and the Veterinary Medicine Research Facility 3B.

Beloved Arabian Horses Inspire Gift to Advance Equine Health
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Linda Von Rotz has a special place in her hear for Arabian horses She recalls first meeting her Arabian stallion Evening Shaide and being captivated with his gentle disposition, intelligence and connection with people.
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Linda Von Rotz with her Arabian mare, Mon Sharade

Linda Von Rotz has a special place in her hear for Arabian horses She recalls first meeting her Arabian stallion Evening Shaide and being captivated with his gentle disposition, intelligence and connection with people.

Evening Shaide soon became an important part of Ms. Von Rotz' life. She took pride in showing her magnificent stallion and his foals in competition. They were highly successful in the show ring-winning national championships and other awards. "I enjoyed being around my talented and 'people' loving horses, who brought smiles and joy to their visitors," Ms. Von Rotz expressed.

One of Evening Shaide's foals was a sweet, beautiful filly named Mon Sharade. With her free-flowing movement, level-headed disposition and charisma, she shined in the show ring. Mon Sharade earned multiple show championships during her halter career.

Then at age four, Mon Sharade's promising career was cut short when she shattered one of her long pastern bones, an injury similar to that claiming the life of Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro. During her road to recovery and beyond, she exhibited great determination and was able to overcome many challenges.

Mon Sharade's tremendous spirit was tested yet again when she developed laminitis in a supporting limb and later foundered on her injured fooot. She was fortunate to have a fabulous team of veterinarians at the Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center caring for her, many of them graduates of UC Davis. New techniques in hoof care as well as innovative treatments, including medications that increased blood flow and provided pain relief, helped her to enjoy quality of life for many years.

Because Mon Sharade's overall physical condition was good, a decision was reached to breed her and try for embryo transfers. Ms. Von Rotz and the veterinary team were elated when Mon Sharade produced two healthy embryos, resulting in the miracle of two wonderful babies, filly Enshantae and colt Entice. Mon Sharade continued in relatively good health for another twenty-one months.

Ms. Von Rotz realized the importance and impact of research at the Center for Equine Health and devided to include a gift through her estate plans to assist the center's mission. "While problems of today are being studied, those results will implement the path of treatment tomorrow," Ms. Von Rotz said.

Laminitis is one of the most serious and debilitating diseases afflicting horses. There is still much to be learned about it, and further health studies are needed. the Center for Equine Health has access to the largest group of internationally recognized researchers in the field of equine medical sciences and is committed to advancing knowledge in the detection, treatment and ultimately prevention of this disease.

While Mon Sharade was able to live comfortably for 10 years after her injury, she eventually succumbed to laminitis. "Mon Sharade was an inspiration to everyone who met her. She has inspired me to do all that I can to help support and advance laminitis research," said Ms. Von Rotz, who is writing a book about her beloved mare. "She was an incredible mare, and every veterinary was amazed by her strong mind and will; she was truly . . .one of a kind." Proceeds from her book will be used to help support laminitis research at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine with the hope that early detection and treatment can save the lives of horses in the future.

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