Vet Med History

1930-1939

Before selection as the school's first dean, Clarence Haring identified the agent that caused equine encephalomyelitis, now controlled worldwide by vaccination. He developed the first intradermal skin test for bovine tuberculosis that helped the US reduce bovine TB to less than two-tenths of one percent. Contributions from Haring and colleagues about the effect of a nationally used vaccine led to almost universal use of this immunization to help control brucellosis.


1930s

Jerry Beach, co-author of an indispensable publication on poultry diseases in California, discovers how Vitamin A prevented a nutritional deficiency in poultry, the first time the vitamin's role had been examined.


1930s

Jacob Traum identifies brucellosis in swine, one of the first of several faculty to tackle this stubborn cattle disease. The scholarship and planning of these and other founding faculty members set the example of teaching, research and service that inform veterinary education at UC Davis to this day.


1938

Agricultural producers, legislators and private citizens press for the establishment of a veterinary institution in California. The agriculture department publicizes a series of livestock disease outbreaks, and individuals cite the need for veterinarians and a place to train Californians for the profession.

1940- 1949

1940

Charles Stream of San Diego County and Michael Burns of Humboldt County introduce AB 15, to fund a veterinary school in California; the bill passes unanimously and is signed in 1941 by Governor Culbert Olson.


1946

After intense planning and the disruptions of World War II, the university regents establish the veterinary school, set its location in Davis and appoint Clarence M. Haring as its first dean in 1947. Haring's leadership, curriculum planning efforts and advising are key to the opening of the school to instruction.


1947

Stuart Anderson Peoples signs on to the faculty as professor and chair of the Department of Physiological Sciences and actively leads development of the academic programs.


1948

The school opens its doors to 42 students, all male and nearly all veterans of World War II.


1948

Anatomy becomes the first professional course in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Under the leadership of Logan Julian and Kenneth B. DeOme, instruction was organized around a new concept of teaching by using a quantitative rather than descriptive approach separates basic and applied anatomy to foster student appreciation of the structural basis for functions. The new method saves classroom time, serves as a curriculum example to other veterinary schools, and contributes to many research projects.


1948

Delbert Grant McKercher, virologist, develops and teaches, single-handedly at first, the first course in veterinary microbiology. He also includes the study of immunology, pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses. McKercher's original syllabus becomes the main reference for certain basic microbiological procedures in the laboratory.


1948-1954

George H. Hart, veterinarian and animal scientist, takes on the mantle of dean and, as Haring did before him, avidly promotes faculty engagement in research as the basis for excellence in teaching. Hart recruits basic scientists as well as clinicians and encourages students to explore research beyond their veterinary studies. Under his leadership, the school launches investigations for the Atomic Energy Commission, Public Health Service and other organizations. Hart's service follows a career of practical achievements in research and veterinary public health. For example, Hart revolutionizes thinking on problems in animal husbandry by focusing on genetics, nutrition and physiology. Hart’s laboratory results routinely demonstrated practical solutions in the field for commercial producers. In veterinary public health, Hart's services as city veterinarian of Los Angeles had vastly improve procedures in the production and handling of market milk.


1940s

Virology researcher John B. Enright uncovers new knowledge about the adaptation of poliomyelitis virus to growth in eggs and its susceptibility to attenuation. These findings ultimately contribute to the development of highly successful attenuated polio vaccines.


1948

Avian specialist Raymond Bankowski and colleagues of the CDFA studying Newcastle disease in chickens report in Science that virus particles can be recovered from the air as a result of natural infection. The team develops methods for diagnosis and for mass immunization by aerosol vaccination, and Bankowski patents a new tissue culture vaccine in the 1940s that prevents heavy losses in flocks throughout California and other states.


1948

Among the school's first students is Blaine McGowan, Jr, of Eureka, CA; his avid interest in becoming a veterinarian and his family's influence in public life were pivotal in establishing the state's only veterinary school. McGowan later serves as a faculty member, making key discoveries in food animal health.


1948

At Haring's retirement from the university, George H. Hart becomes dean. Already a distinguished figure among agricultural producers and a seasoned researcher and instructor of animal husbandry, Hart hired top-flight faculty as well as teaching reproduction and jurisprudence in the third and fourth year curriculum.


1948-1949

One of the first examples of international service provided by the school faculty occurs when virologist Raymond Bankowski travels to Mexico to lend expertise about a foot and mouth disease outbreak and gain knowledge that helps protect US herds from the highly contagious infection.

1950-1959

1950

John D. "Don" Wheat, an equine surgeon, taught for 42 years as a member of the school’s founding faculty. He was best known for teaching and clinical work, and he helped to found an equine research laboratory (now the J. D. Wheat Orthopedic Research Lab) musculoskeletal injuries in racehorses in Haring Hall in 1988.


1950

John Osebold becomes a specialist in the Agricultural Experiment Station in 1950 and joins the School of Veterinary Medicine faculty as a professor of immunology three years later.


1950

Small animal surgeon Robert Leighton describes the method he has developed to pin fractured bones until new bone can grow around it; used for more than 20 years, the method is the precursor to current techniques. Over the years as clinician and instructor, Leighton invents a number of surgical instruments and performs the first surgery of the infraspinatus, a muscle of the shoulder. Leighton is also associated with novel repairs of ruptured anterior cruciate ligaments in dogs. He collaborates with a veterinarian, a physician and an engineer to develop one of the first practical canine total hip replacements.


1950

Because the school is an outgrowth of the Agriculture Experiment Station, Clarence Haring takes charge in directing the AES. Arnold Rosenwald is the first Extension poultry veterinarian at the University of California, serving in Berkeley for four years and then in the school in Davis from 1950 until his retirement in 1977. The school hires John Albert Howarth as an Extension veterinarian. (Howarth's son later becomes a faculty member.) Extension veterinarians stay in close touch with county advisors via in-person meetings and farm publications to discuss laws and methods concerning handling of animal diseases, new drugs and novel therapeutic measures.


1950s

Donald Cordy, Peter C. Kennedy and Jack Moulton found the Department of Veterinary Pathology. Cordy's pathology publications , co-authored by specialists in several disciplines, covered numerous disease processes in avian and livestock species.


1950s

Virologist John Enright presents the first serological evidence of Sporadic Bovine Encephalomyelitis virus in California. His seminal studies in mammals and birds of California describe the ecology of Q-fever (Coxiella burnetii), a disease that can be transmitted to humans from cattle, sheep, goats and other animals.


1950s

Henry Elliott Adler, previously a pathologist for the CA State Department of Agriculture, develops and applies the first really effective bacterin vaccine against erysipelas, an infection that causes sudden death and poses a serious challenge for turkey producers. Adler's diagnostic tool to detect carriers of Mycoplasma gallisepticum serves as a vital advance in eradicating the respiratory infection in turkeys and chickens. Adler also contributes to improvements in egg-sanitizing procedures, hatchery management and efforts to control salmonella and paracolon infections in turkeys.


1950s

Theodore John Hage is one of only two people specializing in radiology in US veterinary schools in the 1950s. His development of radiographic diagnosis of hip dysplasia in young dogs produces a significant impact on canine breeding by permitting early identification and prevention of the genetic defect in future generations. This pioneer, widely respected for his diagnostic skill, establishes an association with medical radiologists that results in the growth of comparative radiology California.


1950s

Founding faculty member Oscar William Schalm, makes discoveries that improve management bovine mastitis, a disease that costs producers nearly $2 billion each year. Schalm's key studies concern the treatment of Streptococcus agalactiae and new strategies for management and development of the California Mastitis Test, still in common use throughout the United States. Schalm’s fundamental insights on the pathogenesis of mastitis and understanding of hematology resulted in far-reaching concepts of the role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of mastitis and their part in protecting against infection.


1950s

Founding faculty member Clyde Stormont becomes the first to identify the 12 blood group systems in cattle. He is also the first to describe the eight genetic systems of red blood cell antigens and their antibodies in horses. The Veterinary Genetics Laboratory developed from this knowledge proves valuable to breeders of many species, including cattle, horses, bison, llamas, dogs, cats and exotics. The laboratory evolves into what may be the largest animal DNA identification center in the world, offering testing services regarding genetic diseases, verification of pedigrees and forensic analysis concerning animal-related crimes.


1953

Pathologist Jack Moulton joins the young veterinary faculty, and, despite limitations to technology at the time, he becomes one of the earliest scientists to make progress in understanding spongiform encephalopathy, particularly scrapie in sheep.


1950s-1960s

While working in Africa, Jack Moulton makes major contributions to the understanding of several important diseases, including African swine fever, East Coast fever and trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness. With the support of two Fulbright scholarships, Moulton studies disease problems in Kenya, advises the University of Zimbabwe on establishing a veterinary school and mentors African students who study at UC Davis.


1950s-1960s

Hugh Cameron, a member of the original planning committee for the School of Veterinary Medicine, continues to publish essential data about the zoonosis brucellosis, a career interest held since publishing his first articles in 1932. Early studies on the viability of Brucella abortus help provide guidelines for the National Program to Eradicate Bovine Brucellosis in the United States. Throughout the 1950s Cameron produces more than 40 papers on the topic as well as publications on other diseases. After Jacob Traum's discovery of brucellosis in California swine, Cameron designs and proposes a technique to control the disease; swine producers in many parts of the world adopt the plan.


1950s

Ernest Biberstein develops medical microbiology methods applicable to veterinary practice. In the 1960s, Biberstein is also tapped to share his expertise in the School of Medicine, and he shapes laboratory course work relevant to both professions. His approach adapts easily to the clinical cases and training as the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital opens in the 1970s.


1952-1958

The virology laboratory led by Raymond Bankowski serves as one of only two in the nation permitted to work with the highly infectious viral agent involved in an outbreak of vesicular exanthema infection in US swine. The virologists are key participants in the control and eradication of the outbreak; since 1959, and the infection has been considered a foreign-animal disease.


1952

The Atomic Energy Commission funds George Hart's studies of radiation in animals that proves to be of world-wide interest regarding nuclear bomb explosions, reactor failures or terrorism. In 1957, based on the success of the project, the commission authorizes investigations into the effects of low-level strontium 90 and radium 226 ("fallout") exposure. Study results expand society's understanding concerning radiation biology and toxicology. Just before the program ends in 1986, faculty experts are called upon to advise on cleanup after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident.


1953

Delbert Grant McKercher, Blaine McGowan, Jack Howarth and J Saito are the first to recognize bluetongue virus in the Western world and its presence in the California sheep industry. The colleagues develop, refine and facilitate widespread use of an effective vaccine.


1954

Donald Jasper assumes the deanship; by the end of his watch in 1962, women are being admitted to the DVM program and the school achieves full accreditation.


1954

John B. Enright isolates the rabies virus from an insect-eating bat in California, only the fourth geographical area in which such an isolation has been achieved. His achievement reveals the important role of bats as carriers of rabies in this and other countries. Enright's related studies illuminate biology, environment, pathogenesis, hibernation and other factors aimed to prevent or reduce disease after an exposure, including studies of the effectiveness of rabies vaccination techniques in humans. Enright's research success and leadership abilities influences the entire teaching, research and service mission, enriching student studies in biology while reducing the use of animals in teaching.


1955

Jacob Traum designates vesicular exanthema of swine, a disease indistinguishable clinically from foot and mouth disease, as a separate entity. This new awareness empowers veterinarians to rule out the dreaded foot and mouth disease in cattle, since vesicular exanthema only infects swine, and helps the agricultural industry avoid costly false alarms.


1955

James Douglas and Norman Baker complete experiments on the efficacy of phenothiazine to de-worm lambs.


1956

Raymond Bankowski solves the mystery of an undiagnosed respiratory illness in chickens when he detects a viral disease agent that he calls Paramyxovirus Yucaipa after the Southern California town of Yucaipa, where he first isolates the pathogen.


1957

Delbert Grant McKercher, Jack Moulton, S Madin and John Kendrick identify and characterize bovine herpes virus 1, the agent causing infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and other economically important infections in dairy and beef cattle. In 1964, faculty develop a vaccine to protect against the virus. Later, Kendrick leads efforts at the school to study aspects of reproductive health.


1957-1964

As Peter C. Kennedy develops science's understanding of fetal and endocrine pathology, he and Louis W. Holm detect the importance of the fetal pituitary adrenal-axis as the triggering mechanism for ruminant parturition and help define other factors involved with prolonged gestation in ruminants. Kennedy is the first to recognize many classic diseases, including Hemophilus agni septicemia, a fatal disease in sheep, and Hemophilus somnus, associated with infectious meningoencephalitis in cattle. He initially describes Boxer colitis, insulin-producing pancreatic endocrine tumors, cerebellar hypoplasia in horses, behavioral changes associated with ovarian tumors in mares, and ram epididymitis. These discoveries bring the school recognition as one of the top pathology programs in the world.


1958

Investigating the safety and efficacy of animal vaccines, Livio Raggi recognizes a new virus contained within a live-virus vaccine meant to prevent infectious bronchitis, a severe respiratory disease of poultry. Raggi warns that the non-standard vaccine is likely spreading the new virus throughout California. The poultry industry helps support construction of a high-security poultry disease research building for the use of the growing program dedicated to such infectious diseases.


1958

Following earlier work that forms the basis for worldwide control of brucellosis in swine, Hugh Cameron investigates antibodies accumulating in the mammary gland of chronically infected cattle and fosters the use of the whey test for brucellosis in cattle as an alternative diagnostic procedure to the testing of blood serum. His work provides national guidelines to eradicate of one of the world's most serious diseases in humans and animals. Cameron's studies with Margaret Meyer show differences in the metabolic patterns of Brucella organisms and provide a much-needed tool for differentiating species and types within the genus. Their teamwork leads to further scientific and practical advances by Meyer.


1958

Walter Tyler begins his research with a grant to continue studies where his doctoral thesis, "Quantitative Anatomy of the Appendicular Skeleton," has left off. His goal is to diagnose and reduce the incidence of bovine dwarfism, which may cause heavy losses to beef producers whose cattle carry the gene. Tyler investigates other serious diseases in poultry and cattle, including muscular dystrophy.


1960-1969

1960

James R. Douglas becomes chair of the Department of Veterinary Microbiology; he and colleague Norman Baker later publish "Chemotherapy of Animal Parasites," a review of drugs therapies used in the control of parasites in livestock.


1960

Peter Kennedy, H. Olander and Jack Howarth outline the pathology of epizootic bovine abortion, a disease of great economic importance to California cattle ranchers. Kennedy influences investigations through the end of the century, when his successors describe the bacteria involved, demonstrate experimental reproduction of the disease, identify its vector and make progress with a practical vaccine.


1960

Theodore Hage becomes president of the Northern California Radiological Society, probably the first time a veterinary radiologist is so honored.


1960

Ernst Biberstein, Gills, and Knight publish "Serological types of Pasteurella hemolytica," which fosters research into the 1980s responsible for characterization and reclassification of the pathogen as Bibersteinia trehalosi. By 1975, research conducted by Charles Hjerpe shows that Pasteurella pneumonias resistant to one or more commonly used antimicrobial treatments are the predominant cause of feedlot cattle death. Faculty develop the industry standard for treatment.


1960-1961

Faculty publish 125 research papers, up from 29 in 1948. In a mere five years, the research budget rises from $218,000 to $1.8 million, including NIH funding for studies and for construction of facilities.


1960s

Walter Tyler conducts early experiments dealing with how young US Navy submarine personnel contract COPD, not a disease of young people. Tyler's investigations, in cooperation with UCSF medical personnel and supported by the US Navy, involve casts of lungs and several demonstrations that thoracic surgery can be performed on horses, the animal model for the disease under study. Tyler contributes much to training and research on veterinary physiology using specialized equipment for lung studies, thoracic surgery, large animal anesthesiology and the measurement of gases and cardiac function.


1960s

Virologist Delbert Grant McKercher is the first to implicate chlamydial agents and viruses in respiratory and genital diseases of ruminants. His work also contributes basic evidence about chlamydial infection of cats.


1960s

John Frank Christensen brings expertise from public and private practice to solve practical problems of the livestock breeder, including coccidiosis of domestic livestock.


1960s

Founding faculty member Donald Jasper, an expert in mycoplasma mastitis in dairy cattle, sets the stage for future successes with his research focused on milk quality, mastitis screening and mechanisms to prevent udder injuries.


1960s

Terrell Holliday earns a reputation as one of the premier veterinary neurologists in the world based on publications about nerve conduction and muscle health, which he assesses using electromyography, spinal cord evoked potentials, electroencephalography, and brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAER) testing. Holliday organizes the first US program in veterinary neurology later in the decade.


1960s

Students voice increased interest in curriculum development, serve on committees and begin publishing course evaluations that provide valuable feedback for instructors.


1960s

The "father" of veterinary hematology, Oscar Schalm, organizes the first veterinary department of clinical pathology in the world.


1961

Jack Moulton becomes best known as the author of Tumors in Domestic Animals, a pioneering text that helps establish veterinary oncology as a specialty in veterinary medicine. The book remains an essential reference for veterinary pathologists and oncologists.


1961

After working as a laboratory technician for more than a decade and despite policy obstacles, Margaret Meyer becomes the first woman at UC Davis to obtain a doctorate in comparative pathology. She later earns distinction as the nation's first professor of veterinary public health in research microbiology. Meyer continues throughout her career to break barriers encountered by female scientists.


1962

William R. Pritchard begins a 20-year tenure as dean; he begins by preparing for major expansion in facilities and the professional curriculum to meet the evolving needs of society. His administrative acumen helps the school gain stronger funding during this phase. By becoming a line-item in the university-wide budget, the school receives some protection from local campus budget decisions and greater recognition as the only veterinary school in the UC system. To address the widening scope of veterinary medicine and education, Pritchard, McFarland and other faculty leaders complete a comprehensive self-study document that gives rise to major curricular and policy changes implemented in the 1970s.


1962

John Christensen, John Osebold and James Douglas identify deer in California as a reservoir of the rickettsial disease of cattle called Anaplasma marginale. The discovery becomes a major factor in the decision not to attempt to eradicate anaplasmosis in the state. Jack Howarth later is credited as co-author of a paper identifying the tick as the carrier of the pathogen in cattle.


1962

The California National Primate Research Center opens. Veterinary scientists carry out federally supported studies on nutrition, reproduction, the effects of aging on cognition and memory, birth defects from thalidomide and other agents. The center develops the simian model for research and early vaccine trials related to HIV and AIDS. Personnel also advance the health and care of nonhuman primates used in human health studies.


1963

Peter Kennedy, Jubb and Palmer publish Pathology of Domestic Animals, a 1,000-page reference that remains in daily use in veterinary pathology laboratories.


1963

Arthur Black’s articles on ruminant metabolism and the biosynthesis of milk in cows brings recognition in the form of the AVMA Borden Award. Black works extensively with collaborator Max Kleiber to examine amino acids in lactating cows. Using radioactive isotopes, they track metabolic processes through the soil-plant-animal systems.


1963

The school, under the direction of A.G. Edward, pioneers a laboratory animal care program like none other in the country. NIH funding follows in 1964 for graduate education in laboratory animal medicine and comparative pathology. The program promotes combined residency and research training that is soon outstanding in its field.


1963

Gordon Thielen is the first to report that cows on a particular dairy farm display symptoms of leukemia. With mentor Oscar Schalm, Thielen successfully identifies leukocytosis in 30 percent of the dairy's herd, a discovery that ultimately leads to greater scientific understanding of leukemia and its viral basis. Thielen's interest in veterinary oncology blossoms as he discovers the first cancer virus in turkeys with tumors from a stem cell leukemia. Theilen's group also identifies the sarcoma virus in cats; the oncogenes turn out to be related to oncogenes in human cancer. The discoveries raise awareness of the value of comparative pathology, which remains one of the strengths of the school.


1964

Virologist Raymond Bankowski identifies a new avian influenza virus in turkeys in the San Joaquin Valley—the first reported appearance of an avian influenza virus in the United States since 1929. Bankowski's group introduces methods for diagnosis and mass immunization by aerosol vaccination as well as a patent for a tissue culture vaccine to protect poultry.


1964

Faculty launch the first food safety program in a veterinary school, establishing the veterinarian's role in protecting food sources from diseases and contamination.


1965

The school and campus enter academic partnership with the University of Chile under the Convenio, an international agreement funded by the Ford Foundation. Veterinary faculty contribute new knowledge to producers in Chile, improving agricultural conditions and advising on practical strategies such as how to prevent the loss of cattle during extended periods of drought. Veterinary graduate student exchange becomes a fruitful outcome of the agreement.


1966

Calvin Schwabe, with Hans Riemann, et al, inaugurates the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, the first of its kind in a veterinary school. The Graduate Group in Epidemiology grows to be an international training ground. In 1969, the school awards the world’s first doctorate in veterinary epidemiology to Peter Schantz.


1966

Blaine McGowan, the preeminent expert on sheep diseases in the US, is the first to diagnose contagious epididymitis in rams. Along with Biberstein, Kennedy and Robinson, McGowan also makes significant contributions to the control of contagious foot rot and pneumonias of sheep.


1966-1972

Associate Dean James Russell Douglas exerts substantial influence on the school's development during the changes of expanding enrollment, curricular change—especially at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital—and physical plant expansion. He also is in demand to advise veterinary schools just opening in such diverse places as Taiwan, Chile (the Convenio), Florida, Mississippi and other locations.


1967

Internationally recognized medical entomologist Michel M. J. Lavoipierre joins the faculty as a professor of parasitology. With extensive experience in Africa and the Mediterranean, he provides insights regarding the impact of vector-borne diseases, such as malaria and leishmaniasis, upon animals and people. He investigates how blood-feeding arthropods attach and how their hosts react. Lavoipierre also provides substantial knowledge about the ecology of mites, fleas and related arthropods; the transmission of arthropod-borne diseases and their vectors; mosquito physiology; and the biology of the mite and sand fly.


1967

Arnold Rosenwald, a highly respected poultry specialist of Veterinary Medicine Extension, is instrumental in initiating the industry-oriented Poultry Health Symposium, a significant training outreach program for veterinarians and producers. Rosenwald's Extension position encompasses significant service over several decades, including his founding in 1951of the Western Poultry Disease Conference, a meeting that evolves into a renowned international conference on avian diseases.


1967-1971

Virologist Livio Raggi serves as one of the first coordinators of the burgeoning program of continuing education, bringing practitioners together with faculty and earning recognition from the California Veterinary Medical Association for his leadership.


1967

Large animal veterinarian Murray Fowler launches the world’s first Zoological Medicine Service; this service dedicated to the health of zoo species and exotic animals becomes the model for similar programs at veterinary schools around the world.


1967

Calvin Schwabe, Hans Riemann, Margaret Meyer, Charles Franti and other faculty introduce a revolutionary professional veterinary curriculum to apply the principles and strategies of epidemiology for mass disease control and prevention in animals. The Master of Preventive Veterinary Medicine degree program, the first of its kind, has since trained leaders in more than 75 countries, benefiting population health and ecosystem health around the world.


1967

Nicholas Lerche directs the Pathogen Detection Laboratory of the California National Primate Research Center, where his new methods result in more accurate and efficient diagnostic tests that improve the health of specific pathogen free nonhuman primate colonies. The laboratory offer tools for technology transfer, training, characterized controls and reagents and proficiency testing for workers in other primate centers around the nation.


1967

John Hughes leads the effort to focus research on horse health by establishing and directing the Equine Diseases Research Laboratory, now the Center for Equine Health.


1968

The scholarly achievements of Peter Kennedy lead to a NATO postdoctoral fellowship; he later earns a Fulbright-Hays Fellowship in 1968 and "serves with distinction" as a consultant to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.


1968

Faculty member and alumnus Gerald V. Ling immediately influences the school's first veterinary training programs in endocrinology, hematology and internal medicine. After the opening of the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in 1970, Ling also helps establish the Small Animal Emergency and Small Animal Outpatient services.


1970-1979

1970

The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital begins a new era in clinical veterinary medicine. The innovative programs set milestones in veterinary medical teaching, advanced training for residents, clinical research and community service. The facility becomes the incubator for new disciplines in the profession. Constructed for 3,000 patients, the facility serves 30,000 patients by the 1990s, and in 2015, the caseload grows to nearly 50,000.


1970

A paper on the components of California smog by Donald Dungworth and fellow veterinary faculty provides the basis for the first air quality standards set down by the original Clean Air Act. These standards, updated several times with the help of the school's researchers, are used throughout the world, providing just one reason that the group remains the premier pulmonary disease research program in the world.


1970

Larry Zane McFarland pioneers studies on the interrelatedness of environmental health and ecology—the influence of environmental factors on body processes. He helps raise society's awareness of anatomical characteristics and physiological mechanisms that permit animals in greatly different environments to survive. His article on the role of selenium in the neural physiology of chickens, turkeys and quail is just one example.


1970s

Harold Parker plays a dynamic part in the development of modern veterinary medical specialties, including veterinary critical care medicine and intensive care; he organizes emergency and critical care services and facilities at the teaching hospital. In the nascent clinical training program, he crafts the first courses in the discipline and, along with Peter Kennedy, Robert Cello and other innovators, exerts a profound influence on the clinical training model.


1970s

Shortly after the opening of the teaching hospital, founding faculty member Raymond A. Bankowski is instrumental in establishing the school's clinical residency training program in avian medicine.


1970s

In addition to its mission to provide the best veterinary care possible to laboratory animals, the Comparative Pathology Laboratory provides training to members of other institutions related to the health of research animals.


1970s

Pharmacist Reed Enos, under the direction of Robert Cello, manages the first pharmacy based in a veterinary teaching hospital. Enos, Cello, Dwight Hirsh and Ernest Biberstein develop a reporting system for adverse drug reactions, a hospital formulary and an antibiotic resistance program. Seminars led by Enos, Hirsh and Gerald Ling on antibiotic resistance become the model for other veterinary school teaching programs and a national network of veterinary pharmacists.


1970s

After significant research in the 1960s on the bluetongue virus affecting sheep, Jack Howarth participates on a team organized by the United States Agency for International Development and the government of Uganda to increase livestock production. He establishes a tissue culture laboratory to focus on Nairobi sheep disease. This work leads to a diagnostic test and immunizing procedures instrumental in the control of this important disease throughout the continent. He advises officials of Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania. Howarth also participates with programs in Brazil (helping establish a national veterinary research arm for Brazil's agricultural research organization), Venezuela, Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, Barbados, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Haiti and Jamaica to enhance research, improve diagnostic capability and control infectious diseases of livestock.


1970s

Jiro "Jerry" Kaneko authors a book on biochemistry for veterinarians that has been reissued at least five times.


1970s

Margaret Meyer pioneers a unique method, based on oxidative metabolism, to distinguish the three main Brucella bacteria and several others. Meyer's test offers the first uniform procedure to identify brucellosis, a cattle disease that causes illness in humans when they drink unpasteurized milk or eat undercooked meat from infected animals. Meyer's work enables epidemiologists to describe risk factors in animal populations, identify reservoirs and trace infections back to the source. England, Germany, France, Russia, Turkey, India, Argentina, South Africa, Mexico and the United States all adopt the test. Meyer's research in veterinary public health helps stop the spread of the disease in animals and people around the world.


1970s

Timothy O'Brien, Roy Pool and John D Wheat, specialists respectively in equine medicine, bone pathology and radiology, lay the groundwork for orthopedic research addressing injury problems of performance horses.


1970s

One of only two microsurgeons in the state, Ira “Gary” Gourley leads the first microsurgical training in both the School of Veterinary Medicine and the School of Medicine. Countless students achieve proficiency thanks to Gourley's expertise in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Gourley and other progressive faculty help define the ground-breaking professional DVM "core and track" curriculum, which provides a foundation in comparative veterinary medicine and electives for exploration of species-specific interests. The approach grows into a model for other veterinary schools.


1970s-1995

The laboratory of pharmacology professor Robert McKernon Joy focuses on the neurotoxic effects of chemicals, particularly chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., dieldrin, endrin and lindane), pyrethroid insecticides and various injectable anesthetics. Joy's laboratory demonstrates that lindane enhances transmitter release and that this effect can be attributed to an increase in intracellular calcium from stores within the cell itself. This work is internationally recognized. Joy contributes significant expertise in the veterinary curriculum and in the core curriculum for the Graduate Group of Pharmacology and Toxicology.


1970s-1990s

Robert Bushnell, Veterinary Medicine Extension specialist, dedicates his career to public practice; his applied research projects identify him as a successor to the veterinary faculty who have improved the prevention and control of mastitis in dairy cows. Bushnell's initiative to provide milk culturing services to California dairy farmers leads to the opening of the Milk Quality Laboratory that now handles 50,000 samples per year. Bushnell is instrumental in establishing new dairy industry standards for sanitation and modern milking and pasteurization equipment; his service to the community regarding bovine mastitis, milk quality and dairy food safety leads to university recognition and a national award for distinguished service.


1971-1997

Anthony Stannard, DVM 1964, PhD 1971, pioneers the modern discipline of veterinary dermatology and dermatopathology. In addition to his investigations of skin disorders in horses, he earns highest accolades as a teacher to veterinary students and mentor of young faculty members.


1972

J. D. "Don" Wheat and John Hughes led an initiative to establish the Equine Research Laboratory (now known as the Center for Equine Health) to promote research and teaching efforts to advance the health of horses.


1972

The first director of the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Robert Cello, draws attention to many issues such as hyperinsulinism in dogs, viral respiratory diseases in cats, feline infectious anemia and electrolyte changes in interstitial nephritis. Cello's professional curiosity and talents lead him ultimately to develop a new specialty in veterinary medicine to address eye problems in animals. He is the first to describe several infections and anomalies—conjunctivitis, keratitis, glaucoma of dogs, infections of the canine eye and the parasite causing ocular onchocerciasis in horses.


1973

Harold Parker performs much of the initial work on peritoneal dialysis in small animals, which provides the foundation for the establishment in 1990 of the school’s pioneering program in hemodialysis.


1973

Randall F. Pritchett, Alex Ardans and Yuan Zee identify and characterize a previously unknown adenovirus in a foal with pneumonia. The authors note that although adenoviruses are found in many animals, it is not common to find a natural infection caused by adenoviruses, so diagnosticians are cautioned to assess laboratory results carefully.


1973

The Oak Tree Racing Association donates funds to establish the Equine Research Laboratory, now the Center for Equine Health. One of the first projects in the partnership involves the investigation of pulmonary bleeding in racehorses.


1973

The school becomes the first veterinary school in North America to adopt a core-and-track curriculum. By 1978, all students receive their fourth-year training in the clinics of the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Other schools follow the School of Veterinary Medicine model.


1974

Murray Fowler initiates a residency program in zoological medicine in cooperation with the Sacramento Zoo. This partnership ultimately expands to the San Diego Zoo and Wildlife Park for a comprehensive, three-year specialty experience. When the Sacramento Zoo builds its own animal hospital on site, the hospital bears Fowler's name in recognition of his clinical and educational contributions.


1975

The publication of "The relation of infection to infertility in the mare and stallion" co-authored by John Hughes encapsulates the leadership and insights of trailblazers in the 1960s and 1970s who define normal reproductive in horses, help explain how infection and other factors affect fertility in mares and stallions, and address other equine reproductive disorders. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Hughes, George Stabenfeldt and other members of this dynamic team contribute extensive knowledge that affects breeding strategies for horse owners. Stabenfeldt's publications include more than 200 articles as well as chapters in several popular textbooks.


1975

Livio Raggi develops the school's first teaching and research program in aquatic animal medicine, initiating research and courses on diseases of fish and shellfish.


1975

When only six cases of Erlichiosis in horses had been reported worldwide, John Madigan and a team of equine veterinarians were the first to identify the agent called Ehrlichia equi. Madigan’s team then published 41 cases in 1981 caused by the pathogen, now known as Anaplasma phagocytophilum.


1975

The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital initiates the nation's first Animal Behavior Service.


1975-1976

Jiri "Jerry" Kaneko begins unraveling mysteries of bovine lymphocyctic leukemia and canine diabetes. During sabbatical leave in Belgium, he observes many diabetic dogs and uses for the first time in veterinary medicine the terms "type 1 and type 2" in animal diabetes—the same names now used for human diabetes.


1975-1980

Jerry Gillespie, EI Eger, Eugene Steffey and Steve Haskins join as charter diplomates and officers of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiology, helping the group achieve full accreditation as a specialty by the American Veterinary Medical Association.


1976

Stuart Anderson Peoples publishes a document for the Environmental Protection Agency, "Uptake, excretion and physiological effects of hexachlorobenzene in lambs," an example of his early environmental health studies on the effects of arsenicals, DDT and other compounds. Peoples develops analytical techniques and detailed investigations of the pharmacokinetics of several agricultural pesticides. Peoples, a member of the founding faculty, serves as first chair of the Department of Physiological Sciences and participates actively in the development of academic programs of the school.


1977

Livio Raggi publishes his discovery of a minute infectious agent that coexists with the infectious bronchitis virus in poultry.


1977

Eugene Steffey's publications on the effects of anesthesia in animals provide the foundation for successful inhalational anesthesia in veterinary medicine. The contributions of his team result in safer, effective management of critical surgical patients and save the lives of thousands of horses undergoing surgery.


1979

Veterinary Medicine II opens, providing enough faculty space for the school to expand class size to 128.


1979

Hanspeter Witschi and Wanda Haschek pose a hypothesis about the cause of pulmonary fibrosis in people, noting that in their experiments "a lack of alveolar epithelial repair was the key event that led to a fibrotic response." The explanation that pulmonary fibrosis results from injury rather than inflammation is revisited after 2000 when medical professionals realize that anti-inflammatory therapies are ineffective. Witchi's decades of pulmonary toxicology experiments advance society's knowledge about the effects of air pollution and tobacco smoke on human lungs; acute and long-term lung injury; carcinogenesis; and risk assessment.


1980-1989

1980

J.W. Osebold, his doctoral student Laurel Gershwin, and Y.C. Zee publish the first evidence that inhaled ozone enhances allergic lung sensitization to allergens based on a rodent model. The discovery provides the framework for developing a monkey model of human asthma decades later.


1980

Randall Pritchett's productive research into the molecular virology of herpes viruses leads to a major National Institutes of Health study, published in 1980, of the genetics among human cytomegaloviruses. The pathogen may be the most significant infectious cause of birth defects in industrialized countries.


1980

Small animal orthopedists develop the first total hip prosthesis for dogs.


1980

After being a partner with campus avian scientists since 1972, the school takes the California Raptor Center "under its wing," establishing a home for the rehabilitation of injured, ill and orphaned birds of prey. The program provides hands-on training to veterinary students and others in the care and management of birds of prey. Open to the public since 1993, the raptor center facilitates veterinary treatment, care of recovering birds and outreach to school groups and other members of the public. Of the 300-350 sick, injured, and orphaned raptors that come to the center each year, faculty, staff and volunteers successfully returning about 60% to the wild.


1980

US News and World Report names UC Davis the top veterinary school in the nation, a designation it receives again in 1997.


1980s

Clinicians pioneer methods and strategies for veterinary critical care medicine, including customized airway management, advanced fluid therapy, intravenous catheter care protocols and CPR standards.


1980s

Donald G. Low—a clinician who produces fundamental concepts in the field of kidney disease—facilitates a formal partnership with the California Veterinary Medical Association to provide continuing veterinary education courses and joint conferences; William Winchester directs the school's meetings for Southern California veterinarians at UC Irvine. The program builds to include notable international meetings on eye health, dermatology and other veterinary topics.


1980s

The school launches the development program to provide current-use funds and build endowments for scholarships and other programs.


1980s-1990s

Gerald Ling publishes numerous studies and develops techniques valuable in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections, particularly in small animals. Ling's activities help establish the emergency and outpatient services for small animals at the teaching hospital. His expert analysis of urinary tract stones leads to the development of the specialized laboratory that bears his name. With his significant collaboration, veterinary geneticist colleagues identify the gene responsible for overproduction of urea in Dalmatian dogs.


1980s-2000s

Bill Lasley’s comparisons of primate and human reproductive endocrinology advance the primate model of human reproduction. Lasley designs, builds and validates tests to quantify the effects of toxicant exposures, stress and disease on fertility in humans. The studies establish bioactivity and immunoactivity indices as prospective markers of exposure and reproductive loss. The novel assays facilitate non-invasive monitoring of reproductive function in many species.


1982-1985

James Cullor, and colleague Brad Fenwick, pursued the groundbreaking work on the J5 core antigen concept in swine and dairy cattle under the mentorship of Bennie Osburn. More than three decades later, the J5 core antigen vaccine they developed has been studied in horses, beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, llamas, mice, rabbits and aquaculture. It has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and severity of Gram-negative bacterial respiratory disease, mastitis, reproduction issues and gastrointestinal diseases. The J5 vaccine saves dairy producers millions of dollars each year by improving animal health, public health, food safety and food security. It is the most widely copied and marketed food animal vaccine to come out of UC Davis.


1982

Edward A. Rhode assumes the duties of dean; he oversees expansion of teaching and research activities as well as construction of facilities, including the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center strategically located off-site in Tulare.


1982

Randall F. Pritchett initiates the graduate course in molecular biology of animal viruses, paving the way for future scientists to answer basic, important questions about transcription, regulation of genomic expression and other topics just beginning to be explored in the field.


1981

Equine surgeons John Pascoe and Gregory Ferraro publish the single most important insight into the nature of a nearly ubiquitous disorder in heavily exercising racehorses described in veterinary textbooks since 1600. They demonstrate that the disorder, which Pascoe names exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, originates in the lungs and not in the nose, as had been believed for centuries.


1983

The Veterinary Medical Teaching and Research Center opens in Tulare, meeting the research and clinical needs of producers in the heart of California's dairy industry, the most productive in the nation. The facility emphasizes applied studies, herd health, productivity and environmental stewardship in production agriculture.


1984

Calvin Schwabe, in his book Veterinary Medicine and Human Health, coins the term "One Medicine," now widely referred to as "One Health." Schwabe, Margaret Meyer and others in the school advocate the integration of veterinary medicine with human and environmental health. Their leadership in epidemiology includes early development of the Master of Preventive Veterinary Medicine degree program for veterinarians.


1984

The laboratory of Bradford Smith collaborates with Stanford University to develop a modified live, genetically altered Salmonella dublin vaccine for calves, licensed in the United States and available to veterinarians around the world. The faculty member dedicates himself for the next 25 years to investigations of Salmonella and methods for detection, control and prevention. Smith and colleagues describe how Salmonella enters, moves and persists in a cattle herd using antibody tests developed in a specialized laboratory. Smith serves as director of the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital from 1994 until his retirement in 2007.


1984

Peter Moore, anatomic pathologist, publishes "Systemic Histiocytosis of Bernese Mountain Dog." Moore pioneers investigations and diagnostics of immune system neoplasia, or abnormal cell growth, in dogs and cats. He becomes instrumental to the development of new treatment recommendations canine lymphoma, leukemia and histiocytic neoplasia. Histiocytic diseases, which include immuno-regulatory disorders and cancer, are most common in Bernese Mountain Dogs, Rottweilers, Flat Coated Retrievers and Golden Retrievers. As the century turns, Moore directs his expertise to the study of leukocyte antigen biology and spontaneous leukocytic diseases of companion animals.


1985

Edward Rhode, veterinary cardiologist/dean emeritus, and imaging specialist William Hornof develop first-pass cardiac imaging of horses using scintigraphy, with emphasis on normal cardiac systolic and diastolic indices. This advance in veterinary cardiology marks the early use of nuclear medicine and alternate imaging in veterinary radiology. Rhode is the first to establish cardiology as a distinct veterinary discipline.


1985

Women DVM graduates outnumber men for the first time. As of 2007, 77 percent of veterinary students nationwide are women.


1985-1990s

Robert Bondurant, large animal veterinarian, pioneers greater understanding of diseases affecting cattle breeding with long-term laboratory investigations and field research on trichomoniasis, which causes abortions and infertility in cattle. He perfects an assay that provides greater precision and speed of test results while eliminating false positives and reducing the cost to producers. Annual losses to the US beef industry from this disease can amount to hundreds of millions of dollars. Bondurant also collaborates with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences to establish the bovine embryo transfer program in support of cattle breeders.


1986-present

The Aquatic Health Program directed by David E. Hinton begins a water quality testing service and research on behalf of statewide environmental agencies. Researchers (and future directors) Inge Werner, Swee Teh and a host of technicians participate in dozens of watershed monitoring projects large and small throughout California, including long-range studies such as the DeltaKeeper Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Project and the Sacramento River Watershed Project as well as targeted testing in the Tuolumne River, San Diego Creek, Cache Creek and other waterways. The laboratory analyzes water from multiple sources such as storm runoff and orchard runoff after pesticide applications to determine how different chemicals affect water quality and animal health.


1987

Ira “Gary” Gourley performs the first successful feline kidney transplant, leading the next generation of veterinary surgeons to develop the school's renowned kidney transplant program and build its reputation for small animal surgery. The school's training program prepares veterinary surgeons to establish several successful transplant programs across the country.


1987

Despite a disturbing arson event during construction, the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory opens in partnership with the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Faculty revitalize California's animal diagnostic laboratories by successfully merging research into service to benefit livestock, poultry, horses and public health. Laboratory personnel carry modern molecular biology into daily use. Conducting nearly 2 million distinct analyses each year, personnel achieve rapid, accurate results and discover pathogens undetectable by conventional methods. The innovations in veterinary pathology, immunology, microbiology, analytical chemistry, toxicology and other disciplines influence quality assurance programs throughout the nation and bring the laboratory recognition and new responsibilities as a key resource for national networks. The laboratory's specimens and other data contribute to teaching as well as research; faculty consult on difficult diagnostic problems, thus providing greater value to producers.


1987

Comparative virology studies of immunodeficiency in cats leads to the first description of feline immunodeficiency virus and a veterinary model that provides early insights about AIDS in humans. Niels Pedersen, Gordon Theilen and colleagues also explore modes of transmission and improve understanding of feline leukemia, feline infectious peritonitis and other viral syndromes. In 2002, the first federally approved vaccine for FIV is based on the team's research.


1988

The California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, the state's veterinary diagnostic laboratory, opens on the UC Davis campus with a faculty dedicated to clinical diagnosis of animal disease. Though targeted in 1987 by arsonists, the public service program succeeds in partnership with the California Department of Food and Agriculture to safeguard the health of California’s livestock and poultry industries and protect the public health from animal disease.


1987

Veterinary cardiologists Mark Kittleson and Paul Pion and nutrition experts Quinton Rogers and James Morris uncover the link between feline dilated cardiomyopathy, a grave heart ailment, and a dietary deficiency of the amino acid taurine. Adding taurine to commercial cat foods reverses the problem and saves thousands of pets' lives. The fruitful Rogers-Morris collaboration results in multiple initial descriptions of essential amino acids in the feline diet and how nutrition affects the health of cats.


1988

Timothy O'Brien, Roy Pool, Dennis Meagher and John D Wheat start a formal program to address orthopedic injuries in racehorses. Endowed as the JD Wheat Veterinary Orthopedic Research Laboratory in 1998, the program advances diagnosis and prevention of catastrophic injuries to improve equine health and welfare. O’Brien's innovations in diagnostic imaging with large animals bring the school international attention for the radiologic characterization of bone and joint problems of horses.


1988

Tilahun Yilma publishes "Protection of cattle against rinderpest with infectious vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the HA or F gene." The veterinary virologist also develops a diagnostic test that is practical to use in the field. Rinderpest is a serious disease of cattle, especially in Africa.


1989

After years of research in and observation of many breeds of dogs, veterinary orthopedist Alida Wind grows convinced that canine elbow arthrosis results from various dysplasias of the elbow joint. With the aid of clients Barbara and Martin Packard, Wind organizes the first international conference on elbow dysplasia; and the group of orthopedists, radiologists and geneticists establishes the first protocols for the evaluation and diagnosis of the condition.


1989

Veterinary scientists based at the California National Primate Research Center are the first to isolate and describe the simian immunodeficiency virus and explore complex comparative studies to promote therapies for AIDS.


1989

The nation's first Pet Loss Support Hotline becomes a national resource for people grieving due to the loss of a pet and an opportunity for veterinary students to gain training and firsthand experience in effective and compassionate communication with pet owners.


1990-1999

1990

The California Horse Racing Board orders statewide post-mortem examinations of racehorses that die at the track to take place at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory. On the research side of the issue, Susan Stover, Roy Pool, J.D. Wheat, Timothy O'Brien, Dennis Meagher and others tackle the trailblazing racetrack breakdown study that characterizes catastrophic Thoroughbred injuries. In less than five years, these experts:

  • Discover that stress fractures precipitate catastrophic fractures
  • Discover new sites, now routinely examined, for stress fractures
  • Advocate bone scan (scintigraphy) installation at Santa Anita Racetrack
  • Develop new bone scan views to enhance detection of stress fractures
  • Associate high-intensity exercise with increased risk for skeletal injury
  • Determine that high-intensity exercise increases risk for layup
  • Determine that layup increases risk for catastrophic humeral fracture
  • Associate horseshoe toe grabs with increased risk for injury, especially suspensory apparatus failure (fetlock breakdown)
  • Discover osteoarthritis in the backs and pelvises of over 25% of racehorses that die for other reasons
  • Improve techniques for sampling and treating the fetlock and pastern joints
  • Recommend better training methods to protect the health and welfare of racehorses.
  • Improve methods for fracture repair (tibia, pastern)
  • Improve understanding of joint cartilage inflammation and function

1990

Larry Cowgill heads up the first veterinary hemodialysis unit, which eventually conducts as many as 1,000 treatments per year as the world's largest program in renal medicine. In 2002, the life-saving service expands to the UC Veterinary Medical Center—San Diego, providing treatment options in cases of acute poisoning or chronic kidney afflictions that would otherwise be life-threatening.


1990

Students establish the Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Homeless. Volunteer faculty and community veterinarians provide basic care and food for the animals of homeless clients one Saturday a month in Sacramento and arrange referrals for spay-neuter and other procedures. The clinic provides valuable opportunities for the students to learn more about high quality medicine, practice management, budgeting, client relationships and technical skills. In 1998, the program receives the Humane Award from the American Veterinary Medical Association.


1990s

Continuing the tradition of excellence begun by Clyde Stormont in the 1950s, the Veterinary Genetics Laboratory pioneers DNA-based animal parentage verification. Using microsatellite DNA markers, the organization becomes the first animal parentage laboratory to offer DNA testing on horses, cattle and camelids such as llamas and alpacas. Led by equine geneticist Ann T. Bowling, laboratory personnel,develop DNA-based tests for elk, deer, dogs, cats, sheep, goats and primates, generating more than two million DNA profiles. Bowling serves as the authority for breeders regarding chromosome structure, coat color traits, horse evolution and the familial connections among different horse breeds.


1990s

George Cardinet introduces the routine use of the computer in the professional curriculum. School-supplied hardware and specialized software programs provide unique, interactive curriculum modules and syllabi that enhance delivery of information and allow for flexible approaches for independent study.


1990s

Edward R. "Rob" Atwill's characterization of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum becomes a model for environmental studies of disease organisms that may affect animals and humans. His research program, incorporating epidemiological models and modern diagnostic testing methods to assess potential health risks, is noted for its collaboration and practical insights.


1990s-2000s

Alan R. Buckpitt, examining the lung toxicology of naphthalene and other chemicals on the lung, contributes a new perspective on how varying responses occur to therapeutic drugs or toxic compounds. His approach takes into consideration the species, individual respiratory systems and different cell types within the lung. Naphthalene is a component of cigarette smoke, car exhaust and smoke from forest fires as well as being an ingredient in mothballs.


1991

Frederick A. Murphy becomes the sixth dean at one of its most difficult times in the school’s history. Between 1991 and 1993 the school loses $2.5 million in state appropriations, drops its entering class size from 122 to 108, and loses 15 faculty positions. Additional retirements during these years reduce the size of the faculty by more than 25 percent.


1991

John Madigan, Johanna Watson, and Peter Heidmann find novel techniques to prevent Rhodococcus equi from causing severe pneumonia in foals. Transfusions of equine hyperimmune plasma reduce the number of cases, though not all. The hospital team also combines macrolide antibiotics with rifampin to improve outcomes of clinically affected individuals.


1991-1993

In response to severe budget cuts the faculty reorganizes its administrative structures in the Dean’s Office and academic departments, reducing the number of departments from eleven to six and combining administrative functions.


1991-1995

To maintain and enhance the research enterprise, faculty members establish a number of species- and discipline focused centers. These multidisciplinary centers provide a focal point for faculty collaboration, enhanced fundraising and grant-writing success. Among the new organizations are the Center for Companion Animal Health, Wildlife Health Center, Center for Comparative Medicine, Veterinary Orthopedic Research Laboratory and Center for Vectorborne Diseases.


1991

After analyzing aborted cattle fetuses over a period of four and a half years, a faculty team including Mark Anderson, Patricia Blanchard, Brad C. Barr, JP Dubey and RL Hoffman at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, working with parasitologist Patricia Conrad, concludes that a Neospora-like, cyst-forming, coccidian is a major cause of abortion in California dairy cattle. The diagnostic thoroughness of laboratory personnel and research faculty provides new information for diagnosticians, practicing veterinarians and agricultural producers.


1992

The laboratory of Robert McKernon Joy provides the first direct demonstration that chlorinated hydrocarbons act as GABA antagonists in vivo as well as in vitro, disrupting the major neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.


1992

With the advent of molecular genetic analysis, the Veterinary Genetics Laboratory makes strides in identifying disease traits in animals. Veterinary geneticists describe hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) in horses, discover the gene responsible and develop the first DNA test to identify carriers of the condition. Horse owners incorporate the tool into their breeding programs to prevent the neuromuscular disease problem in future generations. Since then, faculty and staff have developed tests to screen for severe combined immunodeficiency, overo lethal white foal disease, junctional epidermolysis bullosa and glycogen branching enzyme disease in horses.


1992

The Michael R. Floyd Veterinary Dental Operatory Suite opens in the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, bringing state-of-the-art dental care to pets and providing greater hands-on clinical experience for students. Leigh Hyde-West pioneers dental procedures for patients of the Small Animal Clinic.


1993

Collaborators Antoinette Marsh, Bradd Barr, Andrea Packham and Patricia Conrad identify Neospora hughesii as a species distinct from Neospora caninum. The description of its pathogenesis by Barr, Conrad, Joan Rowe, Karen Sverlow, Robert BonDurant, Alex Ardans, and Michael Oliver improves diagnosis of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, one of the most important causes of neurologic disease in horses in the US.


1994

Patricia Conrad, professor of parasitology, works with physicians and public health experts to cultivate and characterize a protozoan similar to but distinct from Babesia microti, a human pathogen recognized in patients in the western US. The team later characterizes the pathogen as Babesia duncani, a new species of tick-transmitted blood parasite. The scientists' methodology improves diagnosis and identification of human protozoal pathogens—and influences protocols for safer human blood transfusions.


1995

A team of faculty members organized by Donald Low, publishes the UC Davis Book of Dogs: The Complete Medical Reference Guide for Dogs and Puppies to inform lay readers about canine health.


1995

Bone pathologist Roy Pool's evaluation and classification of more than 2,000 bone and joint tumors of dogs and cats forms the basis for the World Health Organization’s "Histological Classification of Bone and Joint Tumors of Domestic Animals."


1995

Philip Koblik and William Hornof describe a scintigraphy technique that becomes the norm for evaluation of patients with possible portosystemic shunts. The diagnostic tool, as well as new techniques for minimally invasive surgery, helps small animal surgeons correct portosystemic shunts. Hornof, Koblik and other imaging specialists introduce magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and other modern imaging tools to the veterinary setting throughout the 1980s and 1990s.


1995

Food animal clinicians construct a flotation tank for “downer” cows. The veterinarians offer critical support, closely monitor recovery and save lives in previously hopeless cases.


1995

Zoonotic disease expert Bruno Chomel describes the epidemiology of cat scratch disease, proposes a link between fleas and hosts, and explores myriad aspects of Bartonella species in domestic and wild animals. Bartonella infections pose serious health risks in older and immunocompromised people.


1996

Bennie I. Osburn, becomes dean, serving three terms. His commitments to research, food animal health-food safety and enthusiasm for the broad role of veterinary medicine become a guiding force for centers and new programs. His leadership despite tough financial times for higher education leads to the $354 million long-range facilities plan, major development initiatives and construction of five major buildings to provide for students, researchers, clinicians and clients of the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.


1996

Veterinary geneticists Marcia Eggleston, et al receive a request from Scotland Yard to determine the source of a mysterious blood sample found after a man is fatally stabbed. The experts provide evidence linking a dog that was on the scene to the main suspect, which helps crack the case. The Veterinary Genetics Laboratory, directed by Ann Bowling, expands its services to identify animals that are present when a crime occurs, stolen or mistreated. The work of Beth Wictum, who manages a national canine database, has enabled law enforcement to identify animals used in fighting and trace them to their owners for prosecution.


1996

Organized by Donald G. Low and Donald Klingborg, the school publishes the Book of Horses, a faculty-written popular guide to all aspects of equine health.


1996

The research budget grows to $46 million, a significant portion of it from private funding.


1996

The school receives a bequest valued at $5.6 million from the estate of Theodora Peigh for student scholarships. By the time the land is sold in 2005 the proceeds realized amount to $13 million. Since the original gift, more than 650 students have received financial support from this donation alone.


1996

The school becomes home to the Center for Vectorborne Disease, a unit that brings together veterinary experts and medical entomologists to study all aspects of diseases transmitted by vectors such as mosquitos, ticks and rodents. Faculty in this group, along with diagnosticians at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, identify the West Nile virus as it enters California for the first time in 2003 after testing 11,000 mosquito pools, 2,000 dead birds and serum from 5,000 wild birds.


1996-1997

Challenges surrounding animal rescue efforts during devastating floods in Northern California spotlight the critical need to incorporate organized animal rescue methods into emergency response planning. John Madigan, other faculty members, staff and volunteer students labor for more than a decade with statewide agencies to build a veterinary disaster response program based on the Standardized Emergency Management System. The Veterinary Emergency Response Team effects several high-profile rescue operations; protocols developed by Madigan, et al to airlift stranded livestock to safety by helicopter are adopted nationwide.


1997

The school and the California Veterinary Medical Association create the Donald G. Low/CVMA Practitioner Fellowship. The unique program supports practicing veterinarians for four weeks of up-to-date clinical training and professional exchange in the teaching hospital. Donald J. Klingborg is instrumental in establishing the program, which reflects Low's passion for the ongoing education of veterinarians.


1997

The California Department of Fish and Game signs a memorandum of understanding to assign oversight of the Oiled Wildlife Care Network to faculty based at the School of Veterinary Medicine. With Jonna A.K. Mazet's leadership the network becomes an international model for rehabilitation, research and education. The statewide coalition of agencies, academic institutions and wildlife organizations forms the largest such program in the world. Faculty and trained rescue personnel rescue, treat and rehabilitate sea birds and other wildlife affected by oil spills along California's 1,100-mile coast. By 2015, network personnel have responded to 75 oil spill events and cared for nearly 8,000 animals. Under the direction of wildlife veterinarian Michael H. Ziccardi, the network serves in an essential role in the aftermath of the 2007 Cosco Busan spill in San Francisco Bay and the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon explosion. The academic research increases understanding of the consequences of oil exposure and improves response technology.


1998

Laurel Gershwin led the team to reproduce the vaccine induced disease enhancement that occurred in children vaccinated with a formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine. Development of the bovine RSV as a model of RSV enhanced disease provided evidence to inform testing of future RSV vaccines.


1998

Veterinary microbiologists and pathologists describe papillomatous digital dermatitis, or hairy footwarts, which emerged in California during the early 1990s, as a distinct and economically important disease of cattle. Faculty veterinarians determine that spirochetes play an important role and develop antimicrobial treatments.


1998

The incoming class expands from 108 to 122 students and includes 97 women—a record 80 percent of the year’s enrollment.


1998

The University of California Veterinary Medical Center—San Diego expands the school's clinical services and research collaborations into Southern California. By 2008, the center is offering specialized services in pharmacy, nutrition, cardiology and renal medicine. Kidney hemodialysis is available when time is of the essence to treat acute kidney failure, especially in cases of anti-freeze poisoning.


1998

The school celebrates the 50th anniversary of its mission of teaching, research and service excellence to benefit animal, human and environmental health.


1998

The AVMA Council on Education judges that aging facilities are inadequate for the school's mission. Limited accreditation status sparks a period of intense fundraising and construction of several state-of-the-art teaching, research and clinical facilities that transform the medical sciences complex into a modern veterinary campus. The Wayne and Gladys Valley Foundation provides $10.7 million—the largest gift in campus history at the time—for a $354 million long-range facilities plan and construction of new infrastructure.


1998

The Center for Comparative Medicine, a joint program with the School of Medicine, launches advanced biomedical research on persistent diseases shared by animals and humans such as AIDS, influenza and Lyme disease.


1998

Veterinary parasitologist Walter M. Boyce and Jonna A.K. Mazet, a veterinary epidemiologist become co-directors of the Wildlife Health Center. The two propagate numerous programs in California and abroad dealing with a host of wildlife species, diseases affecting animals and people, and habitat issues. In 2006, the organization and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife craft the California Wildlife Action Plan to identify critical needs regarding problems of greatest conservation concern and determine actions needed to protect California's wildlife.


1998

The school launches a $50 million campaign, its most ambitious development effort to date.


1998

Fish pathologist Ronald P. Hedrick, an expert on whirling disease in trout and salmon, discovers a new, fatal herpes virus believed responsible for the deaths of several show-quality ornamental koi being judged at a New York event. Hobbyists from Europe, Asia and the U.S. may have taken the virus home and infected other animals. As ornamental koi rise in popularity and price (up to $10,000), the spread of disease presents international challenges for hobbyists regarding transport, ideal water temperatures and judging methods at shows.


1999

Environmental toxicologist Bill Lasley and a team of reproductive experts discover that dioxin exposure may cause early fetal loss in the nonhuman primate, a reproductive model for humans. The scientists also demonstrate the value of endocrine biomarkers in identifying a toxic exposure to primate pregnancy before direct signs of reproductive toxicity appear.


1999

Veterinary neurologist Richard LeCouteur and pathologist William Vernau, with radiologists Philip Koblik and Robert Higgins, demonstrate the first CT-guided, stereotactic brain biopsies, a novel way to diagnose canine brain tumors accurately and safely.


1999

To assure the integrity of the Thoroughbred racing industry, protect animal welfare and learn more about how medications affect equine health, the Kenneth L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory opens. Laboratory personnel perform required drug testing on roughly 36,000 samples each year from equine athletes. The laboratory develops new tests and carries out research in equine pharmacology.


1999

The Institute of Medicine inducts Frederick A. Murphy, the school's dean 1991-1996 and professor of virology, for his career contributions in zoonotic viral disease. He is the sole veterinarian of 55 individuals elected. Following Murphy's achievement, the organization adds veterinary expertise to its ranks when Stephen W. Barthold, Patricia A. Conrad, and Jonna A.K. Mazet join prestigious and active body, and Michael D. Lairmore carries the same distinction when he arrives as dean.


1999

Veterinary epidemiologists aid decision makers in Taiwan to deal with a serious outbreak of foot and mouth disease in swine. Timothy Carpenter and Mark Thurmond, founders of the Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance, develop surveillance systems for the detection, prevention and eradication of animal diseases and their associated economic impacts. They employ spatial epidemiology, epidemiologic modeling and health and ecologic risk analysis. The program becomes integral to national planning for possible incursion of foot and mouth disease in the US, avian influenza in poultry, abortion storms in cattle, anaplasmosis, brucellosis in wildlife and plague.


1999

Queen Margrethe II of Denmark confers knighthood on Hans P. Riemann for his decades of service in microbiology, food safety and veterinary epidemiology in Denmark and the United States. Riemann develops the first course work on food-borne disease at the school and is instrumental in the establishment of veterinary epidemiology in Scandinavia.


2000-2009

2000

The multidisciplinary team consisting of veterinary immunologist Laurel Gershwin, pulmonary pathologists Dallas Hyde and Charles Plopper, physiologist Ed Schelegle, and human pediatrician Jesse Joad, develop the first monkey model of human asthma. The monkey model demonstrates for the first time that occasional exposure to dust mites and the air pollutant ozone can change how the lungs of young rhesus monkeys develop—then lead to a disease similar to childhood asthma in humans. Asthma affects up to 15 million people in the US, one-third of them children. The disease appears to be on the rise, making biomedical research into its causes and prevention a high priority. Plopper's extensive basic research also explains much about normal lung development at the cellular level.


2000

The SeaDoc Society begins environmental studies and scientific liaison work in the Salish Sea, Puget Sound and other inland waters of the Pacific Northwest. Among its first resources are maps of the floor of Puget Sound that aid in analysis of marine populations. Just 10 years later, director Kirsten Gilardi and chief scientist Joe Gaydos, after fostering studies of infectious disease, trauma and habitat of marine dwellers large and small, join fellow veterinarians and scientists to publish the "Top Ten Principles for Designing a Healthy Coastal Ecosystem."


2000

Veterinary pathologist Linda Lowenstine and a group of marine mammal scientists identify domoic acid poisoning as the cause of death in more than one hundred California coast sea lions; the neurotoxin was produced during three episodes of algal bloom between 1998 and 2000.


2000

The world's first Shelter Medicine Program dedicates research, education and services to animal shelters to improve the health and adoptability of homeless pets; the school also runs the only shelter medicine residency in the nation. In 2002 the group confirms a rare, often fatal, calicivirus outbreak in Southern California cats and works with practitioners to contain the disease within several weeks.


2000

A study co-authored by Linda Lowenstine supports the hypothesis that the presence of a novel gamma herpes virus is a factor in the development of urogenital cancers in California sea lions. The researchers show that the virus thrives in the reproductive tract and, among adults, is twice as common in males—infecting 45 percent of them—as in females. Millions of pounds of DDTs and PCBs dumped into the ocean by manufacturing companies between the 1940s and the early 1970s remain in the environment. Lowenstine and collaborators show that herpes viruses and chemicals may interact to trigger tumors, possibly by suppressing the immune system or influencing hormone balance. She develops reagents to diagnose viral infections.


2000

The first formal veterinary information model, designed by James T. Case, improves the coordination of medical record-keeping among public health professionals by including animal-related data, environmental samples and food safety samples.


2000

Sharon Hietala and Mark Thurmond develop pooling methods as a low-cost strategy to screen for rare but persistent diseases such as bovine viral diarrhea virus. This approach improves diagnosis at significantly reduced cost to producers. The program, run at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, also fosters large-scale surveillance of diseases previously too cost-prohibitive to manage routinely.


2000s

Linda Munson's passion for training and certification of veterinary pathologists, particularly in wildlife pathology and medicine, profoundly influences a generation of veterinary pathologists around the world. As head of the hospital's pathology service and the residency program in anatomic pathology, Munson incorporates intensive training into a service known for diagnostics of the highest quality. Munson's initiatives, including a successful push for financial support for graduate students, bring attention to the evolving role of pathologists in wildlife health. This work now guides advances in training to meet these needs. A cadre of her trainees now leads in the field across the country.


2001

A team led by John Madigan explains the life cycle of Neorickettsia risticii, the agent of Potomac horse fever, which offers evidence that freshwater snails and flukes (larvae) help transmit the disease. The research debunks a long-held theory that the disease was spread by ticks. The new knowledge leads to more effective measures to prevent the disease and the associated risk of potentially fatal cases of laminitis.


2001

To nurture food animal medicine careers and promote food safety awareness with intensive practical training, Bradford P. Smith organizes the Early Veterinary Student Bovine Experience Program, offering several weeks of in-depth experience with producers in California's unique dairy industry and veterinary practitioners in the field.


2001

Neurotoxicologist Isaac N. Pessah agrees to head the Center for Children's Environmental Health to study for the first time possible links between pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls or heavy metals and the development of autism. The center, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences makes several discoveries of note within less than 10 years:

  • Pessah's veterinary study links thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative, with immune dysfunction in mice. In a large population-based study, center researchers report that typically developing children and children with autism have similar levels of mercury in their blood streams.
  • Irva Hertz-Picciotto, et al show how polychlorinated biphenyls alter normal patterns of developing brain cells; findings may explain associations between exposures to PCB's and behavioral deficits. The impairment is a common feature of a number of conditions, including autism spectrum disorders.
  • Cecilia Giulivi reports that autistic children are far more likely to have deficits in their ability to produce cellular energy from their mitochondrial DNA, which directly affects brain function, than are typically developing children. Her further studies in mice show that abnormal action of a single gene disrupts energy use in neurons. The harmful changes are coupled with antisocial and prolonged repetitive behavior—traits found in autism.
  • Eleonora Napoli and Cecilia Giulivi discover in 2014 that children with autism experience deficits in granulocytes, a type of immune cell that protects the body from infection. The cells exhibit one-third the capacity to fight infection and protect the body from invasion compared with the same cells in children who are developing normally.
  • Pessah co-authors a study in 2012 uncovering the first known link between flame retardants and the social, behavioral and learning deficits associated with autism.
  • Pessah and fellow researchers find strong evidence that triclosan, an antibacterial chemical widely used in hand soaps and other personal-care products, is of concern to both human and environmental health; the experiments reveal changes in muscle function.

2001

The annual research budget reaches $61 million, with 54% of funding dedicated to human and environmental health issues.


2002

Fern Tablin, veterinarian and cell biologist, plays a pivotal role on the team that deciphers for the first time how the activation process of blood platelets and develops more reliable storage methods for human blood products.


2002

To prepare future faculty members and fill a growing need in the workforce, the school launches the Veterinary Scientist Training Program, providing four students with financial support for up to seven years and a flexible course of study so that they can pursue Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy degree training. By 2006, the program is supporting a dozen scholars.


2002

The school and the School of Medicine introduce the Master of Public Health degree program. Veterinarians with the degree pursue careers in food safety, zoonotic disease and other aspects of veterinary public health. Veterinary faculty including Philip H. Kass and Thomas Farver, whose technical skills form the underpinnings of successfully designed clinical and basic science studies, lead course work in epidemiology and medical statistics.


2002

Alan Conley is named a Chancellor's Fellow for his "early career accomplishments and potential to influence fellow researchers." Conley's reproductive research in different species at the earliest stages of development delivers abundant insights into gender differentiation, the nature and regulation of sex hormones, and the improvement of reproductive function.


2002

Wildlife veterinarian Melissa Miller and Patricia A. Conrad, parasitologist, pinpoint Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona as important causes of fatal brain infections California's endangered Southern sea otters. Cats are the only animals known to shed oocysts, the tough, environmentally resistant eggs of the single-celled Toxoplasma parasites, which may move to the marine environment via freshwater runoff. Toxoplasmosis presents a danger to pregnant women and individuals with compromised immune systems.


2002

The Western Institute for Food Safety and Security unites academia, government and industry in a focused research effort encompassing plant- and animal-related food safety and security at every stage of the food production continuum. The consortium in 2004 receives $4.7 million from the Department of Homeland Security to train personnel how to prevent, recognize and deal with potential terrorist acts directed at the nation's food supply.


2002-2003

The emergency preparedness and molecular diagnostics of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory helps federal and state agencies bring an outbreak of Exotic Newcastle disease under control in poultry. In partnership with the California Department of Food and Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine Extension, laboratory faculty including Alex Ardans, Sharon Hietala and others combine an emergency response plan, strict quarantines and rapid elimination of birds with an in-depth surveillance program. Peter Woolcock develops the virus isolation protocol while the laboratory provides round-the-clock service and helps develop a DNA-based test that improves accuracy while drastically reducing the wait time for test results. More than 24,000 samples per month are processed by this PCR method. One producer reports that the testing saves his business one million dollars. James Case's informatics role speeds communication of case reports and diagnostic results to halt the epidemic. Veterinary Medicine Extension specialist Carol Cardona conducts outreach and builds trust among backyard breeders to help rein in the spread of disease. Working intensively on this complex challenge, the partners contain the outbreak two years sooner than expected, saving poultry producers more than $500 million.


2002, 2006, 2007

The American Veterinary Medical Association bestows its Animal Welfare Award to three faculty members for their extraordinary commitment to animal well-being. The awards are given to wildlife medicine expert Murray Fowler for his ongoing dedication to the health of exotic animals such as camels, zoo species, llamas and alpacas; to equine clinician John Madigan for his organization of large animal rescues and development of emergency response protocols during natural disasters involving animals; and dairy veterinarian James Reynolds of the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center for his voluntary service in England in response to the 2001 epidemic of foot and mouth disease in the United Kingdom.


2003

James Case of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory plays a major role in a pilot program whose goal is to set national reporting standards of medical records, including reports of laboratory and other clinical observations. Case is instrumental in the design and development of the electronic data exchange processes for the National Animal Health Laboratory Network and serves as the veterinary expert on the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine for the National Library of Medicine. The move improves coordination of patient information and data analysis. Universal standards assure that the most effective communication occurs, particularly during disease outbreaks when rapid response is critical.


2003

Veterinary nutritionist Andrea J. Fascetti unveils the Nutrition Support Center to meet dogs' and cats' exacting dietary needs, manage or prevent disease related to diet, and contribute to successful management of clinical cases at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.


2003

Veterinarian Holly Ernest uses genetic analysis to explain that mountain lion populations in different geographic regions of the state possess distinct genetic structures; results help officials anticipate migration patterns and manage wildlife corridors.


2003

The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital establishes the first veterinary pharmacy residency to familiarize pharmacists with unique aspects of veterinary clinical pharmacy and veterinary pharmaceutical research; the program's first resident becomes the head of the pharmacy service in the school's UC Veterinary Medical Center—San Diego and in turn mentors pharmacists interested in this exceptional field.


2004

The school launches the Students Training in Advanced Research program, STAR, which provides a funded opportunity for veterinary students to explore up to 10 weeks of in-depth research in established faculty laboratories. Selected students pursue their own research projects under the close mentorship of faculty, culminating in poster presentations to faculty, staff and students. Mentors nurture and inspire the scholarly careers of a number of students and enhance the appreciation of all students for the value of basic research.


2004

Veterinary geneticist Leslie A. Lyons teases out the genetic mutation for polycystic kidney disease in Persian cats. She develops a DNA-based test and works in concert with breeders to eradicate this most prevalent inherited disease in cats.


2004

Equine veterinarian and PhD candidate Monica Aleman identifies the genetic roots of equine malignant hyperthermia, a life-threatening disorder that may develop during anesthesia. Aleman's diagnostic tests lead to better preventive strategies and insights about the condition in horses, other animals and humans. In 2005, the school selects Aleman, now a faculty member, to direct a laboratory whose research targets neuromuscular diseases of horses.


2004

The Center for Companion Animal Health opens its new $16 million facility, built entirely with private funds. The building's cancer center triples the capacity for cancer treatments and provides laboratories for genetics and cancer research.


2004

Investigators from the Center for Comparative Medicine develop a sensitive PET-scan in mice. The technology helps detect cancer cells at different disease stages and may lead to better evaluation of cancer-fighting drugs in people.


2005

Carol Cardona of Veterinary Medicine Extension and Walter Boyce of the Wildlife Health Center join other infectious disease experts at UC Davis to inform the public and coordinate strategies to prevent an epidemic of avian influenza in the US. Boyce heads a nationwide surveillance program focusing of wild birds of the Pacific Flyway, testing for the presence of infection that could be transmitted to domestic birds.


2005

Bruce R. Charlton and the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory staff develop a PCR assay used extensively in California to screen for Salmonella enteritidis, which causes food-borne illness in humans.


2005

Veterinary ophthalmologist Steven Hollingsworth performs the first ultrasound studies of the eyes of 12 client-owned snakes. The exams produces the first detailed data about the structure of healthy snake eyes. The exercise provides an exceptional learning experience for veterinary students and residents while moving the profession closer to the goal of improving medical care for snakes.


2005

Veterinary cardiologists Mark Kittleson and Kristin MacDonald identify the gene mutation responsible for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common heart disease of cats. The discovery marks the first observation that a spontaneous genetic mutation causes any type of heart disease in a cat or dog and the first report of a mutation related to the particular disease in a nonhuman species. The knowledge helps breeders prevent the problem, and it provides insights into the disease that caused the deaths of Reggie Lewis of the Boston Celtics' and Loyola Marymount University basketball player Hank Gathers.


2005

A new, rapid diagnostic test developed in the Real-time PCR Research and Diagnostics Core Facility identifies canine influenza, an emerging infectious disease of special concern for shelters and kennels. The laboratory uses molecular detection methods to provide accurate diagnosis of animal or plant diseases and assist with research of the highest quality.


2005

Kirsten Gilardi, leading the SeaDoc Society, decides to clean up lost and abandoned fishing gear along the California coast to reduce underwater hazards to fish and marine mammals, boats, divers and swimmers. Within six years, the program retrieves 60 tons of fishing nets, traps and pots; working with communities to install recycling stations on public piers, the organization collects more than a million feet of fishing line. The program expands to the Pacific Northwest; Gilardi calculates that spending $1,358 on removal of one underwater net can save almost $20,000 worth of Dungeness crab over 10 years.


2006

The veterinary research budget expands by 44 percent to $96 million for studies of animal, human and environmental health.


2006

Three National Institutes of Health grants totaling $5.7 million expand the Mouse Biology Program to develop and share genetically altered laboratory mice serving as models of animal and human disease. This trusted center receives $37.8 million in 2011 to develop additional models and establish a phenotyping center relevant to studies of human cancers, diabetes and heart disease. Likewise, resources and expertise of the Mutant Mouse Regional Resource Center and the Knock-Out Mouse Project support biomedical advances worldwide.


2006

Geneticist James Murray's research in transgenic goats may lead to the production of milk with properties that can protect infants against diarrhea, which kills more than 2 million children each year around the world.


2006

Instruction crosses a new threshold when Dean Bennie Osburn and the faculty dedicate Gladys Valley Hall, a classroom complex that accommodates large-scale lectures, classroom discussions, independent computer study, student volunteer activities and continuing education events. In 2007, the laboratory designed for clinical instruction of surgery, anesthesiology and radiology also opens; the Ira M. "Gary" Gourley Clinical Teaching Center honors the memory of the esteemed professor of small animal surgery.


2006

Faculty members of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, working with state and federal agencies, succeed in developing a single, rapid test to screen for foot-and-mouth disease and six "look-alike" diseases in livestock.


2007

Colleagues Birgit Puschner, Robert Poppenga, Linda Lowenstine, Michael Filigenzi, and Patricia Pesavento find a combination of melamine and cyanuric acid causes acute toxicity in cats. Both chemicals are components of contaminated pet food linked to widespread acute kidney failure in cats, dogs and other animals. California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory personnel diagnose the index case in California. Laboratory toxicologists quickly develop a method to analyze the compounds in kidney tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The World Health Organization invites Puschner to contribute to an assessment of the toxicological aspects of melamine and cyanuric acid in human infants.


2007

The Western Institute for Food Safety and Security implements the only comprehensive training course for agro-terrorism preparedness certified by the US Department of Homeland Security.


2007

Endocrine specialist Bill Lasley, et al suggest for the first time that exposure to commercial, antimicrobial personal care products containing sufficient amounts of trilocarbon may amplify the bioactivity of hormones present in the body. The authors report that triclocarban represents an entirely new category of endocrine-disrupting substance. An increasing number of studies in lab animals and humans reveals that some synthetic chemicals in household products can cause health problems by interfering with normal hormone action.


2007

Veterinary dermatologist Stephen D. White and geneticist Danika Bannasch team up to identify the mutation associated with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia, HERDA, and develop a DNA screening test to help horse owners avoid breeding animals that have or carry the debilitating, degenerative skin disease.


2007

In 20 years, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System personnel publish more than 1,000 scientific papers that report advances in the understanding of a variety of diseases and disease agents, as well as the development of enhanced diagnostic techniques. Three faculty members count among the top 25 authors for international veterinary medicine and animal health citation impact, 1994–2004.


2007

Veterinary faculty offer International Flu School in six African countries, demonstrating the power of preventive veterinary medicine. Trainees go on to improve animal health, human nutrition and small-farm income.


2007

The Western Institute for Food Safety and Security implements the only comprehensive training course for agro-terrorism preparedness certified by the US Department of Homeland Security.


2007

Entomologist Gregory Lanzaro demonstrates that the level of the protein maxadilan, in the saliva of sand flies correlates with the severity of leishmaniasis in humans. Maxadilan is the most potent vasodilator known. Lanzaro's identification of novel proteins holds potential for developing vaccines and improves our understanding of the role of host resistance in protozoal disease. Leishmaniasis, which can be fatal, infects up to 12 million people in 88 countries—and becomes a concern in the US when soldiers sent to Afghanistan and Iraq return home.


2007

A collaboration with the Cheetah Conservation Fund and the Smithsonian Institution leads to the first in vitro cheetah embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage. Reproduction consultant Autumn P. Davidson and Tomás Baker, using endoscopes and ultrasound, observe female cheetah reproductive tracts to evaluate long-term health and how age influences fertility, particularly in captive cheetahs. Investigations have implications for species survival. Davidson and Baker also participate with the Smithsonian Institution to evaluate reproduction and fertility in endangered lemurs in Madagascar and giant pandas in China.


2007

The Oiled Wildlife Care Network responds to the largest Northern California oil spill in a decade when the Cosco Buscan hits the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Volunteers log in more than 13,000 hours of service to handle nearly 3,000 injured or dead sea birds.


2007

Veterinary Medicine III A opens. The research and multipurpose teaching facility incorporates clinical, teaching and research laboratories and helps co-locate DVM teaching activities that have been scattered around campus for more than 30 years.


2008

Linda Munson's article, "Climate extremes promote fatal co-infections during canine distemper epidemics in African lions," contributes significant data and insight into the ecology of canine distemper virus, a widespread and highly contagious threat to wildlife. In dozens of investigations, Munson demonstrates her expertise on the reproductive pathology and diseases of free-ranging terrestrial wildlife; she consults on several Species Survival Plans. Her collection of more than 2,000 mammalian reproductive tracts establishes her as an international authority on reproductive pathology in free-ranging and captive canids and felids. Munson's papers on helicobacter gastritis and veno-occlusive disease in cheetahs as well as the effects of captive stress on cheetah health prove how disease surveillance programs can further the health, well-being and conservation of wild and captive animals.


2008

The school's 60th anniversary dovetails with the UC Davis campus centennial of teaching, scholarship and service to California.


2008

Researchers led by Danika Bannasch identify a gene mutation causing high levels of uric acid in all Dalmatian dogs and bladder stones in some Dalmatians; the discovery offers clues to the cause of similar problems in humans.


2008

Although the drug ivermectin is widely used in veterinary medicine to treat worms and is generally quite safe, clinical faculty Janet Aldrich, Steven Haskins and Kate Hopper of the emergency and critical care service, show that Collie dogs are prone to toxicity. The breed can suffer from severe and prolonged side effects. With intensive care treatment, including respiratory, cardiovascular and nutritional support available at the teaching hospital, however, patients can experience complete recovery.


2008

The Transfusion Medicine Service directed by clinical pathologist Sean D. Owens opens the Canine Community Blood Donor program. The program provides a large, reliable source of blood products. Donor dogs receive free health screenings and access to blood should they need it. With the onset of the program, the school closes its on-site donor colony and finds permanent homes for retired donor dogs. The transfusion service, the largest west of the Mississippi, provides 200-300 transfusions per year for small animal patients at the teaching hospital and up to 500 procedures in cats, pigs, horses, cows, sheep llamas, donkeys and goats.


2008

Stephen W. Barthold, co-inventor of the first approved vaccine for Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne illness in the United States, reports that a certain number of Lyme disease bacteria may linger after a full course of antibiotic treatment. While the findings do not mean that Lyme disease will be chronic, new knowledge enables investigations of potential therapies in cases of persistent Lyme disease. Barthold also serves as the first director of the Center for Comparative Medicine, a joint program with the School of Medicine.


2008

Wildlife Health Center veterinarians partner with the White Oak Environmental Center and a host of international faculty for Envirovet. The summer program of academics and field work aims to increase the number of veterinarians working to solve environmental problems that threaten animal and human health. Since its inception in 1991, more than 400 veterinarians and students from 47 countries have trained in the program.


2008

The Student Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society creates the first student-sponsored scholarship endowment.


2008

Committed to outlining the One Health connections among wildlife and human health, Jonna A.K. Mazet, co-founds the Health for Animals and Livelihood Improvement project with communities of Tanzania to improve the quality of water sources shared by people, wildlife and domestic animals.


2008

The school confronts financial challenges in almost every program, administrative function and facilities plan as an unprecedented economic crisis affects state, federal and private funding.


2008

Researchers at the Veterinary Genetics Laboratory develop the first test to identify and help prevent equine cerebellar abiotrophy, a serious neurological disease in Arabian horses.


2008

Feline geneticist Leslie A. Lyons completes a study in which researchers conclude that all ancestral roads for the modern day domestic cat also lead back to the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, identified as humanity's "cradle of civilization."


2009

Kimber L. Stanhope, Jean Marc Schwarz (co-first authors) and faculty endocrinologist Peter Havel learn how fructose-sweetened beverages can adversely affect metabolism in overweight people, increasing visceral fats and decreasing insulin sensitivity. The effects can cause medical conditions that increase susceptibility to heart attack and stroke. In another obesity study, Stanhope, Havel, faculty member Helen Raybould and others show for the first time that a surgical procedure in rats similar to bariatric surgery in humans causes biochemical changes that can delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. The molecular researchers later show that a high-sugar diet raises levels of three known risk factors for heart disease: LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and a protein that can lead to plaque buildup in arteries.


2009

A USAID grant of $75 million to the Wildlife Health Center sponsors PREDICT, a program of global disease surveillance to prevent wildlife pathogens from spreading to humans, especially in disease "hot spots." The consortium quickly produces a web-based, open-access map to help governments and health agencies track emerging infectious diseases around the world.


2009

The Veterinary Genetics Laboratory contributes to the completion of the sequencing of the equine genome begun by Ann T. Bowling and James Murray; the project's findings hold important implications for improved breeding and health of horses. One year later, researchers Alison L. Ruhe, Aaron Wong and Mark W. Neff contribute UC Davis expertise to the completed dog genome.


2009

Linda Munson leads a decade-long multidisciplinary effort to determine causes of a catastrophic population decline in the Channel Island fox. The wildlife pathologist helps identify canine distemper—likely transmitted by raccoons—as the cause of a devastating epidemic. A vaccination program and related efforts help restore the fox population. Ongoing contributions include efforts to characterize certain tumors in the species, analyze fox genetics and perform overall health monitoring.


2009

Using a specialized frame to position the head, digital imaging, computerized treatment plans and a linear accelerator, radiation oncologist Michael Kent begins treating patients with "stereotactic radiosurgery." The technique delivers high doses of radiation to precise tumor sites—an efficient and noninvasive alternative to surgery when tumors are located deep within the brain or close to vital brain areas.


2009

One of the first individuals to recognize that heart disease is a major cause of mortality for all the great apes in captivity co-founds the Great Ape Heart Project. Pathologist Linda Lowenstine becomes instrumental to the school becoming in 2009 the new home of the international Mountain Gorilla One Health program, now known as Gorilla Doctors.


2009

The Health and Livelihood Improvement project examines the effects of zoonotic disease and water management on health and livelihoods in Tanzania; the project is the first of several One Health projects initiated at the school.


2010-2015

2010

The value of well-trained veterinary pathologists is evident in Linda Munson's lead authorship of "Elements of good training in anatomic pathology," an summary of the goals of professional pathologist training. A personal legacy, the Linda Munson Fellowship for Research in Wildlife Pathology, supports advanced study of wildlife disease pathology. Munson's gift inspires colleagues, sponsors and training institutions to establish 29 new pathology training positions at 16 North American universities, supported by more than $6.8 million.


2010

Working cancer specialists at the UC San Francisco medical school, veterinary neurologist Peter Dickinson conducts treatment trials in dogs with naturally occurring brain tumors. The strategy combines surgery, chemotherapy and a specialized pump to deliver drugs directly to tumor sites inside the brain. The evaluation provides valuable data on treatment safety and effectiveness in humans.


2010

The collaboration of large animal clinician Michael Lane with a practitioner on a large dairy farm addresses the health effects of inducing labor in cows past their due dates. Their findings indicate improved reproductive success after calving and impact recommendations for the standard of care of pregnant cows. Applied research by Lane and other clinician-scientists uses clinical, epidemiologic and economic perspectives to solve health problems in the field.


2010

Veterinarian Stan Marks and a UC Davis physician collaborator perform a novel, laser-assisted surgery and correct a near-fatal swallowing disorder in a young dachshund. In 2013, the same team breaks further ground when the surgeons perform the first canine laryngectomy to save the life of a dog rescued from a shelter.


2010

Susan M. Stover presents data indicating that synthetic racetrack surfaces have significant potential for reducing musculoskeletal injuries in Thoroughbred racehorses.


2010

Sandra Newbury and Kate Hurley contribute to the first publication of "Standards of Care in Animal Shelters." Both are affiliates of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program.


2010

Gary Marty, a veterinary pathologist and research associate who has studied the health of pink salmon since the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, reviews 20 years of fish production data, compares them with 60 years of population counts of adult pink salmon and concludes that the main suspect, sea lice from fish farms, has no significant effect on the productivity of the wild salmon population.


2011

In the 1990s, faculty have characterize the bluetongue virus genome and virulence factors affecting international trade and develop improved diagnostics (an innovative ELISA, or enzyme immunoassay) and vaccines for the disease. N. James MacLachlan, et al now report drastic regional alterations in the global distribution of the infection since 1998, particularly in Europe. Multiple novel serotypes are detected in the Southeastern United States, and variants of the typical virus appear in the Middle East and Australia. The collaborators suspect that global climate change influences these events as outbreaks occur with regular frequency, especially at the upper and lower limits of the virus’ global range where infection is highly seasonal.


2011

The Veterinary Genetics Laboratory Forensic Unit provides the first DNA analysis successfully used in animal cruelty prosecutions in New York City; the lab's evidence results in two felony convictions.


2011

Faculty implement the first year of their student-centered curriculum, which radically changes course work, teaching methods and clinical training to best prepare veterinary graduates to enter practice. For the next several years, faculty successfully juggle quarter and semester schedules as they transition to the new curriculum. Students gain additional clinical experience (48 weeks total), with core rotations and electives based on specific interests. The added rotations prepare students to accomplish entry-level standards of clinical proficiency combined with some higher-level competencies.


2011

Equine veterinarians and diagnosticians provide critical care services and timely guidelines that help California halt a serious outbreak of the rare and highly contagious equine herpes virus-1.


2011

Endocrinologist Peter Havel and his team find that the hormone leptin actually lowers blood sugar levels in mice prone to type 2 diabetes; this knowledge may lead to better diabetes treatments.


2011

Comparative cancer specialist Xinbin Chen announces that a protein, RNPC1, appears to play a key role in the formation of lymphoma. The protein inhibits the p53 gene, a tumor-suppressing gene of animals and people. Chen has focused on p53's tumor-suppression qualities and how they may be thwarted by mutation and other events. Lymphoma, a blood cancer associated with overproduction of white blood cells, occurs spontaneously in dogs, representing 6 percent of all canine cancers—the disease is remarkably similar to lymphoma in humans.


2011

Tilahun Yilma, the International Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Tropical Disease and an international team develop and successfully test two genetically modified Rift Valley fever vaccines that could be adapted for humans.


2011

The school receives a $2.6 million award from the US Department of Agriculture i to carry out research aimed at reducing the incidence of bovine respiratory disease, including pneumonia. The leading cause of death in beef and dairy calves, bovine respiratory disease results in the death of more than one million animals and the loss of $692 million each year. Terry Lehenbauer, director at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare, leads a project at a local calf ranch concerning the genetic components of disease resistance and other factors that influence risks in young Holstein calves prior to weaning. He also manages a case-control study to distinguish genetic differences in calves with and without symptoms caused by common viral and bacterial pathogens. Laurel Gershwin contributes expertise in immunology by working with seven different agents of bovine respiratory disease as part of the project.

Efforts are redoubled in 2013 when investigator Sharif Aly joins the project to advance risk assessment, welfare analysis and Extension education.


2011

Michael D. Lairmore becomes the 8th dean immediately leading the first comprehensive strategic planning effort to build mission-focused programs that further promote outstanding education for society-ready veterinarians, innovative research to advance clinical veterinary medicine and public health, and state-of-the-art patient care. Under his leadership the school’s faculty expertise and program impacts have been recognized as the #1 veterinary medical program in the world by QS World University Rankings and #1 in the nation by the U.S. News and World Report. He has launched the Veterinary Center for Clinical Trials, grown the school’s species focused centers of excellence, expanded the research enterprise to $70 million annually, opened the new Veterinary Medicine #B collaborative research building, constructed the Veterinary Medical Student Services and Administration Center and launched planning for a new veterinary medical center.


2012

An international team led by Stephen J. McSorley of the Center for Comparative Medicine takes a vital step toward the development of an effective vaccine against Salmonella, a group of increasingly antibiotic-resistant foodborne bacteria that kills hundreds of thousands of people worldwide each year. McSorley describes common antibody responses in mice and humans, which could prove helpful in developing vaccines for particular Salmonella infections. Prevention is a global health priority as antibiotics prove less effective in fighting the pathogen.


2012

Veterinary oral surgeons Frank J.M. Verstraete and Boaz Arzi, working with biomedical engineers, prove that an experimental reconstructive procedure can regrow jawbones in dogs that have lost bone to injuries or removal of cancerous tumors. Early success with eight canine patients indicates that this data will translate into practical biomedical treatments in human and veterinary medicine.


2012

Faculty, staff and administrators implement a five-year strategic plan to integrate initiatives related to the school’s mission, curriculum, faculty recruitment, research, clinical service, finances and infrastructure.


2012

Pamela Lein organizes the $17 million research center dedicated to identifying medical countermeasures for chemicals that cause seizures in humans and animals. Lein brings 10 years of leadership in identifying the mechanisms by which organophosphorus pesticides cause neurotoxicity. The goal of the CounterACT Center of Excellence, part of an NIH network, is to identify biomarkers of neurotoxicity and therapeutic strategies following developmental, occupational or acute exposures. The research is also expected to help improve medical treatment of seizure disorders in people. Lein's previous research has been cited to set regulatory limits for organophosphorus pesticide applications, and for proving the value of traditional biomarkers of exposure in identifying individuals at risk for neurotoxicity.


2012

As part of a national, targeted surveillance program, personnel from the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory help identify the fourth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to occur in the United States and determine that the animal had the “atypical” form of the disease. This form is not associated with previous BSE outbreaks in humans, and the cow, an older animal, does not enter the food supply.


2012

The school initiates an ambitious program of "molecular food safety," the interagency 100,000 Foodborne Pathogen Genome Project. The aim is to sequence the genomes of 100,000 infectious microorganisms and speed diagnosis of foodborne diseases using precision methods. The team, led by microbiologist Bart C. Weimer, is developing a public database of Salmonella, E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes bacteria as well as common foodborne and waterborne viruses that sicken people and animals.


2012

Kate Hopper, whose specialty is emergency and critical care medicine, treats a paralyzed border collie, placing the patient on a ventilator for 22 days until he can breathe and move again on his own. Knowledge gleaned from this rare case is expected to greatly increase understanding of mechanical ventilation in veterinary practice.


2012

Food animal researchers join a $25 million USDA effort to prevent potentially fatal illnesses linked to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli bacteria. James Cullor, Dairy Food Safety Laboratory, conducts research aimed at reducing microbial counts on cattle hides during processing and tests radiofrequency technologies to inactivate E. coli on beef carcasses. Terry Lehenbauer and Sharif Aly, faculty of the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare use data from preliminary studies to improve understanding the epidemiology and ecology of the pathogen and develop the scientific protocols for animal-sampling projects. The research emphasizes dairy cattle, including male Holsteins raised for beef production.


2013

Twenty-one years of genetic research into vectorborne diseases leads to the discovery that two key subgroups of malaria-causing mosquitoes, while genetically distinct, can and do exchange genes due to crossbreeding. Medical entomologists Gregory Lanzaro and Yoosook Lee explain that developing an accurate picture of gene flow through matings within and between these two mosquito groups could prove key to preventing malaria, which kills more than 660,000 people each year around the world, mostly in Africa. The researchers continue to investigate the role of insecticide resistance in different types of mosquitoes.


2013

Generous donors provide 710 scholarships and awards to students amounting to $2 million. The scholarship endowment is enhanced by the school’s grant program, which distributes another $2 million in financial support. More than 90 percent of veterinary students at UC Davis receive scholarship or grant funding.


2013

To accelerate the identification and development of diagnostics and therapeutics nationwide for the benefit of veterinary and human patients, Dean Michael D. Lairmore initiates the launch of the Veterinary Center for Clinical Trials. More than 40 clinical trials are in progress at the outset.


2013

Companion animals continue to receive the most technologically advanced patient care at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital with the help of:

  • A new TrueBeam linear accelerator allows UC Davis radiation oncologists to deliver more powerful cancer treatments with pinpoint accuracy and precision. It uniquely integrates new imaging and motion management technologies within a sophisticated new architecture that makes it possible to deliver treatments more quickly while monitoring and compensating for tumor motion, opening the door to new possibilities for a wide range of treatment options.
  • The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer is the most advanced diagnostic tool for rapid identification of bacterial and fungal organisms; the instrument significantly shortens the time required to initiate patient care/treatment.

2013

Postdoctoral fellow Chelsea Rochman of the Aquatic Health Program finds that when marine creatures ingest plastics in the ocean, they may receive not only the ill effects of the plastic, but also damage from pollutants those plastics absorb while floating in the open seas. She notes that the most commonly produced plastics also absorb the most chemicals, and for longer periods of time than previously thought.


2013

A national leader in veterinary research, the school celebrated the opening of Veterinary Medicine 3B—a leading-edge biomedical research facility dedicated to a variety of issues such as environmental pollution, food safety, public health, and infectious diseases, including those that can be passed between animals and humans. UC Davis leads the nation’s 28 veterinary schools with $67.2 million in research funding for the fiscal year 2012-2013.


2013

Leigh Griffiths, assistant professor of cardiology and cardiac surgeon at the school, teamed with three biomedical engineers from the campus to develop a new approach to heart valve replacement— potentially giving transplant patients longer, healthier lives. Their collaboration won the annual Big Bang! Business Plan Competition at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management.


2013

Studies from the newly dedicated Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center discovered the presence of brucellosis in harbor seals and the H1N1 flu strain in elephant seals, increasing the understanding of One Health issues among human, animals and the environment. Years of research by the center also contributed to California’s ban on lead ammunition.


2013

The Western Institute for Food Safety and Security remains on the frontlines of protecting the nation’s food supply thanks to a $10.5 M grant renewal from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the next five years. The center is heavily focused on assisting the FDA with the national implementation of the proposed Produce Safety Rule and part of the Food Safety Modernization Act.


2013

Jonna Mazet, director of the One Health Institute, visited Washington D.C. to lead a White House briefing on PREDICT—a project of USAID’s Emerging Pandemic Threats Program that aims to prevent, detect, and rapidly respond to novel infectious pathogens that can spread from wildlife to humans.


2013

Veterinary and human surgeons teamed up to perform the first canine laryngectomy to save the life of Bean, a shelter rescue.


2013

FARM Club students won a new portable ultrasound machine thanks to their ingenious music video parody that won first place in a contest.


2013

Faculty launched year three of a new curriculum, built on the foundations of defined learning outcomes, acquiring entry-level clinical skills, problem solving, critical thinking and lifelong learning. Jonna Mazet was elected to the prestigious Institute of Medicine, one of the nation’s highest honors in health and medicine. She is the fourth faculty member from the school to be elected and joins only 17 total IOM veterinary medicine members.


2013

A three-day Donkey Welfare Symposium held at the school drew people from around the globe to learn more about the health and welfare of the world’s leading working animal.


2013

Danika Bannasch was appointed as the inaugural recipient of the Maxine Adler Endowed Chair in Genetics.


2013

The Koret Shelter Medicine Program developed the UC Davis Virtual Consultant, a free online self-evaluation tool for shelter staff, veterinarians, and volunteers world-wide to help improve the well-being of shelter animals.


2013

The school provided 710 scholarships and awards to students amounting to $2 million—more than $200,000 more than last year. The scholarship program is enhanced by the school’s grant program, which provides another $2 million in financial support. More than 90 percent of students receive scholarship or grant funding.


2013

Staff member Harold Davis, manager of the Emergency & Critical Care Service, was selected as the 2013 Western Veterinary Conference Veterinary Technician Continuing Educator of the Year. Davis, who has worked at the VMTH for more than 30 years, is an outstanding example of the dedicated, professional team of staff supporting the clinical service, research and teaching missions of the school.


2013

Dr. Isaac Pessah appointed Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education. He is responsible for leadership of the Research and Graduate Education Office, administrative oversight of contracts and grants, enhancing the school’s research portfolio by regular analysis of extramural funding opportunities, developing and implementing strategic approaches to increase competitiveness of individual faculty or faculty groups in research and providing administrative leadership to increase training grants, program projects, and center grants within the school.


2013

Dr. Sean Owens appointed Associate Dean for Student Programs. He is responsible for leadership, of the Student Programs Office; provision and coordination of support services for professional students; management of the DVM admissions process; pre-veterinary outreach activities including diversity and career advising; and student ceremonies.


2013

Dr. Claudia Sonder appointed Director of the Center for Equine Health (CEH). As Director, she will provide leadership of the CEH, manage the U.S. Department of Agriculture certified Contagious Equine Metritis isolation facility and testing center, and act as a liaison between the school and the equine industry in California and nationally.


2013

Dr. Michael Kent appointed as Director of the Center for Companion Animal Health (CCAH. He has responsibility for ensuring the CCAH promotes the health of small companion animals through enhanced support of teaching, research, and patient care programs, management of allied facilities and competitive grants programs, and promotion of the achievements of the Center.


2014

SeaDoc Society scientists and collaborators throughout the country publish a paper linking a densovirus to sea star wasting disease. The scientists demonstrate that the mysterious virus is involved in the deaths of millions of sea star along the West Coast and has infected more than 20 species. The same virus has been found in museum specimens of sea stars collected decades ago, suggesting that a mutation in the virus may have prompted the outbreak, considered the largest marine disease outbreak in history.


2014

Pulmonary disease specialists of the school have developed unique models of human disease and performed controlled studies implicating ozone and dust mite allergens as culprits in poor lung development. Lisa Miller proves in the real world that exposure to high levels of fine particle pollution affects lung function and development of the immune system in monkeys living outdoors at the California National Primate Research Center. When Northern California wildfires pushed smoke across the Sacramento Valley in 2008, Miller, head of the respiratory unit, measured levels of small particles at the UC Davis campus over a period of 10 days of peak air pollution. Levels rose to 50 to 60 micrograms per cubic meter. Some readings reached nearly 80 micrograms per cubic meter, well over the federal standard of 35 micrograms per cubic meter. She tested lung function and took blood samples from monkeys that were two to three months old and noted particular issues in young animals and females.


2014

One of the first residencies in reproductive medicine of companion animals begins through the Small Animal Theriogenology Service at the veterinary hospital. With support from the American Kennel Club and the Theriogenology Foundation, the program provides specialty training in all aspects of reproductive medicine and surgery, obstetrics and neonatology.


2014

T-cells (lymphocytes) in humans and other mammals ignore normal biologic protocol and swing into high gear when attacked by certain fast-moving bacteria, reports immunologist Stephen McSorley, of the Center for Comparative Medicine. McSorley's team is the first to define the specific immune pathway, which provides critical information for designing future vaccines and medicines to prevent or treat deadly infections, particularly from Salmonella and Chlamydia.


2014

Reproductive physiologist Alan Conley characterizes the hormone dihydroprogesterone, DHP, which may lead to better hormone therapies for preventing pre-term labor in pregnant women. His work ends a 50-year mystery as to how horses sustain the last half of their pregnancies without detectable progesterone in their bloodstreams. Wildlife species may also benefit from Conley's findings.


2014

Geneticist Danika Bannasch identifies the genetic mutation responsible for a form of cleft palate in the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. She says that insights from the discovery, based on the first dog model for the craniofacial defect, may lead to a better understanding of cleft palate in humans. Although cleft palate is one of the most common birth defects, affecting approximately one in 1,500 live human births in the US, it is not completely understood. Graduate student Zena T. Wolf and oral surgeon Boaz Arzi co-author the transdisciplinary study.


2014

The veterinary hospital launches the Integrative Medicine Service, expanding its offerings of acupuncture, physical rehabilitation, and chiropractic procedures, as well as exploring future offerings pallative care and alternative methods of pain management.


2014

Nicola Pusterla develops the first structured approach to investigate and control infectious disorders in horses using epidemiology, clinical understanding, diagnostics, prevention and treatment. His research focuses on equine herpesvirus-1 (he is a critical resource for horse owners during EHV-1 outbreaks of in 2011 and 2012), equine influenza, equine coronavirus, equine protozoal myeloencephalitis and other diseases. For example, though equine coronavirus is known to exist in foals, its appearance in adult horses alarms veterinarians. Pusterla’s review of 268 horses from eight outbreaks in six states outlines length of infectiousness, common clinical signs and the most effective testing method.


2014

Food animal veterinarian James S. Cullor, long-time director of the Dairy Food Safety Laboratory, shares practical, proven dairy management techniques with veterinarians, veterinary students and government officials in Rwanda as part of the UC Davis Global HealthShare Initiative. The team focuses on low milk yields caused frequently by mastitis, a bacterial infection of the udder that reduces milk production, causes milk to be unfit for sale and may result in cow death. The training program can help farmers increase milk production to feed their families and provide a safer product.


2014

A team by veterinary cardiologist Joshua Stern identify a gene mutation responsible for canine subvalvular aortic stenosis, the most common inherited heart disease in dogs. The potentially lethal congenital disease also affects children and other dog breeds including the golden retriever. The new knowledge will help breeders make informed decisions about the health of their dogs.


2014

A study shows that the bluetongue virus, costing US cattle and sheep industries $125 million annually, survives the winter by reproducing in the biting midge that transmits it. The findings are particularly significant as global climate change brings more moderate winter temperatures around the world. Co-authors include Christie Ellen Mayo, virologist N. James MacLachlan, William K. Reisen, an entomologist, Cameron J. Osborne and Ian Gardner, an epidemiologist specializing in studies of food animal disease.


2014

Patricia Pesavento, working with members of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory—Santiago Diab, Sabrina McGraw, Bradd Barr, Ryan Traslavina, Robert Higgins, Patricia Blanchard and Guillermo Rimoldi—discover a new virus associated with brain inflammation in cattle. After ruling out several possible causes of neurological disease, the scientists perform genetic analysis, made possible by the Human Genome Project, and pinpoint a new astrovirus, which they name BoAstV-NeuroS1. The ability to diagnose the problem may aid in finding new treatments and helps diagnosticians rule out reportable diseases such as rabies.


2014

When the Ebola crisis hit countries in West Africa, veterinary medicine researchers from the school headed to the frontline. They served a critical role by conducting laboratory testing to identify cases so that rapid tracing of patient-contacts could begin, thereby reducing the transmission of the disease. These researchers, graduates of the Veterinary Scientist Training Program, have the joint skillset of a DVM and PhD—making them invaluable in situations like this Ebola outbreak where emerging and zoonotic diseases can have such a devastating impact.


2014

UC Davis leads the nation’s veterinary schools with $74 million in research funding for the fiscal year 2013-2014. Many research findings can be translated from veterinary medicine to human medicine, such as discovering the genetics of cleft palate in a particular dog breed that will aid in understanding this human birth defect. Melanoma treatment in dogs also holds hope for human patients.


2014

Many faculty members were recognized for their contributions and expertise including:

  • Associate Professor Matthew Mellema received the national AAVMC Distinguished Teacher Award.
  • Professor John Madigan delivered the keynote Milne Lecture at the American Association for Equine Practitioner’s Convention to a standing room only crowd.
  • Professor Sue Stover received the prestigious Founder’s Award from the American College of Veterinary Surgeons.
  • Professors Xinbin Chen and Gino Cortopassi joined the illustrious ranks of AAAS Fellows.

2014

Students for One Health joined with School of Medicine students to provide monthly basic veterinary care for pets of an underserved agricultural population at the Knights Landing Clinic.


2014

The school successfully achieved an ambitious goal of raising $160 million in philanthropic gifts as part of The Campaign for UC Davis, an 8-year comprehensive fundraising effort. More than half of this total— over $80 million—was directed to research and program support, and nearly $32 million went to help students.


2014

Shelter medicine was recognized as a veterinary specialty by the American Veterinary Medical Association board—thanks in large part to the dedicated efforts of Kate Hurley, associate director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program.


2014

The school’s One Health approach is highlighted by the PREDICT program—a project of the One Health Institute that received a $100 M grant from USAID to continue the work of preventing pandemics.


2014

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded $800,000 to scientists studying how chemicals interact with biological processes, to better understand the potential health effects of chemical exposures.


2014

UC Davis researchers presented a study representing the largest genetic sampling of mountain lions in Southern California, which supported the concern regarding loss of genetic diversity due to animal populations being cut off from each other by freeways and human development.


2014

Veterinary students won the inaugural Veterinary Innovation Challenge with a clever idea for owners to better care for their pets using smart phone technology.


2014

In a follow-up to a previous study of the effects of neutering, it was discovered that neutering poses more health risks for golden retrievers than Labradors.


2014

Researchers solved a century-old mystery when they determined the survival mechanism for bluetongue virus, a serious disease that annually costs U.S. cattle and sheep industries an estimated $125 million.


2014

Veterinary oral surgeons increased the scope of their novel jawbone regrowth surgeries by successfully performing a nearly complete lower jaw reconstruction in a dog that lost part of her jaw to cancer.


2014

Thanks to surgical techniques developed in a veterinary clinical trial, a veterinary ophthalmologist was able to successfully treat cornea disease in a dog and hopes to discover the gene causing the disease.


2014

As California continues to struggle with ongoing drought, UC Davis’ Western Institute for Food Safety and Security, provided guidance for dairy farmers and ranchers with information on workshops, assistance application sessions and on-line resources. The California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory system published a special report on drought-related feed toxicity to build public awareness of this health risk.


2014

The California Raptor Center released a young, female golden eagle after more than eight months of treatment and rehabilitation for a novel mite infestation, first identified by UC Davis veterinary epidemiologists.


2014

The Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service collaborated with the Biomedical Engineering Department, and the use of 3D printing of skulls for the treatment planning of challenging maxillofacial cases; now an integral part of the Service.


2014

Dr. John Madigan delivered the keynote Milne Lecture at the 2014 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention to a capacity crowd of more than 3,000.


2014

Drs. Eric Johnson and Rachel Pollard continued pioneering work in image guided tissue ablation and other minimally invasive therapeutic techniques.


2014

The Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction Service included new offerings in embryo transfer, laparoscopic artificial insemination, and semen services for small ruminants.


2014

UC Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine leads all veterinary schools in research funding - $65 million.


2014

Oiled Wildlife Care Network (OWCN) Director Mike Ziccardi called to Bangladesh to help with oil spill. A cargo ship rammed a tanker in Bangladesh’s Sela River in December of 2014, spilling 92,000 gallons of oil into the worlds’ largest mangrove forest. Dr. Ziccardi spent 2 weeks helping during the spill’s aftermath. OWCN a global resource.


2014

The Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service began the use of cone-beam computed tomography as a routine procedure for advanced diagnostic imaging of dental, maxillofacial and temporomandibular joint disorders in dogs, cats and rabbits.


2014

Dr. Patricia Conrad appointed as the first Associate Dean for Global Programs. She is responsible for developing a vision, mission, and strategic plan to foster global programs in education, research, service, outreach and engagement; creating databases to track faculty and student projects globally; building extra-mural resources for global programs and identifying potential partnerships with investigators seeking support through sponsored research related to the school’s mission.


2015

Equine researchers unveil ramifications to human health in their research into equine injuries. Peta L. Hitchens, Ashley E. Hill and Susan M. Stover, collaborating at the JD Wheat Veterinary Orthopedic Research Laboratory, analyze data from a six-year period during which 707 Thoroughbred and Quarter horses experienced race-related catastrophic injury or sudden death and find that jockeys are 171 times more likely to be injured when they ride a horse that dies in a race. Two studies describe in detail the types of equine injury associated with falls. The scientists conclude that "prevention of the most common catastrophic injuries and conditions of the racehorse, e.g. fetlock injuries, may be most effective at decreasing rates of falls and injuries to horseracing jockeys during racing."


2015

The UC Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine is ranked #1 in veterinary science by the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings, widely considered to be one of the most influential international university rankings providers based on scholarly metrics. This is the first year that veterinary science has been included in these rankings.


2015

The UC Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine is ranked #1 by the U.S. News and World Report.


2015

The Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction Service worked with a client in Nevada to bring Gascon cattle, a French breed used primarily for beef production, to the U.S. for the first time.


2015

The Ophthalmology team performed a lip commissure to eyelid transposition for the first time. The surgery created new eyelids from cheek/lip tissue for cats with eyelid agenesis.


2015

The California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System protected animal health through early detection of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in a commercial poultry operation in Kings County, CA. Early identification allowed for containment before a widespread state-wide outbreak could occur.


2015

The Cardiology Service established a relationship with the UC Davis Medical Center Pediatric Cardiology Service and worked together to repair rare congenital heart defects in a cat and a dog. The cat’s story (Vanilla Bean) was covered by more than 200 media outlets nationwide, including the New York Times and ABC News.


2015

Veterinary students coordinated the 2nd annual Adopt-a-thon as their “Oath in Action” project with the American Veterinary Medical Foundation. The UCD led multi-species event featured free veterinary exams and microchips for pets, free vaccinations and primary care for adopted animals, and fun-filled family activities such as an animal photo booth, police K9 unit, agility course, service dog presentation, behavior training consultation, pet CPR class, and disaster rescue demonstration. The event drew approximately 1,000 people and featured 37 booths, including 12 animal shelters and rescues, and seven vet student clubs. More than 30 veterinary students and 12 DVMs volunteered their time and expertise. There were 15 animals adopted on site including dogs, cats, chickens, rabbits, snakes, tortoises and guinea pigs.


2015

The veterinary hospital staff scheduled more than 50,000 appointments and logged a record-breaking number of telephone calls -- including a record 1,294 calls in one day.


2015

Faculty members of the Dermatology Service collaborated with the UCD School of Medicine to present teaching opportunities to medical students.


2015

The Integrative Medicine Service expanded to include orthotic and prosthetic fittings, allowing animals to walk more easily and comfortably, or at all.


2015

Dr. John Madigan’s “squeeze technique” to treat neonatal maladjustment syndrome, which may have a connection to autism, was featured in hundreds of publications throughout the world and the YouTube video of the story was viewed more than 250,000 times. Drs. Madigan and Monica Aleman noticed that the hormones that keep the foal asleep in utero, are significantly elevated in these foals suggesting that they need to “wake up.” By applying a simple squeeze technique to simulate the 20-30 minutes of getting squeezed in the birth canal, they’ve had remarkable success.


2015

The Cardiology Service expanded imaging capabilities with the addition of a high frequency transesophageal echocardiography probe, which allows the use of ultrasound guidance during cardiac procedures to repair congenital heart defects.


2015

Using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), reproduction specialists were successful in assisting with the first foal ever born at UC Davis by in-vitro fertilization.


2015

Clues about veterinary medicine—filmed at UC Davis—appeared on three episodes of nationally-televised game show “Jeopardy.”


2015

Drs. Claudia Sonder and John Madigan led the school's team to help support the animals and their owners displaced by the Valley Fire crisis. In concert with county animal control, OES emergency response and CVMA disaster response leaders, the school's VERT team was activated to help locate animals for transport to temporary animal shelters, to provide food and water to stranded livestock and assist with animal health needs. On September 14, the veterinary hospital received the first of what would become dozens of animals from the Valley and Butte Fires over the following three weeks. In total, the hospital treated 56 animals – 40 cats, 5 chickens, 4 horses, 2 pigs, 2 goats, 2 dogs, and 1 rabbit. The hospital team, already at 90 percent capacity with client patients, worked long hours (volunteering nights and weekends) in order to accommodate the sudden influx of critical patients.


2015

A new, state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging laboratory (Comparative Ophthalmic Imaging Lab), was established which will be used both for clinical patients and clinical trials.


2015

The Anatomic Pathology Service developed digital pathology, which will enhance the hospital’s ability to interact remotely, and more accurately assess morphometrics of tissues.


2015

The Veterinary Medical Teaching and Research Center (VMTRC) in Tulare launched a new internship focused on dairy nutrition and feeding systems. In partnership with the California Dairy Research Foundation, this new program will train future leaders in feed manufacturing, dairy feeding systems, nutrient management and feed and food safety.


2015

At the annual Alumni Weekend, the school welcomed graduates from the classes of 1955, 1965, 1975, 1985, 1990, 2005 back to campus for social events, tours, lectures and the Rose Ceremony for the 50th reunion class (1965). Special honored guests included members from the first graduating class of 1952, Drs. John Shirley and George Puterbaugh. More than 5,000 veterinary professionals have graduated from the school and gone on to successful careers and leadership positions.


2015

The Center for Continuing Professional Education produced 28 programs for a total of 257 hours of programming attended by 867 veterinarians, 509 RVTs and 1,073 animal owners. Program highlights included: the Inaugural One Health Symposium, which offered CE to vets and CME to Medical Professionals; the International Conference on Feline Health; and the first Backyard Poultry Seminar.


2015

Launched VetMedJobs through the Career, Leadership and Wellness Center - an online program to help match students and employers


2015

In collaboration with the School of Medicine and College of Biological Sciences, the school opened the new Health Sciences District Advanced Imaging Facility which features:

  • A Leica 3d STED Super Optical Confocal Microscope – which can image structures below the limit of diffraction in 3D. High speed resonance scanner allows the use of live samples.
  • A Multiphoton Confocal with CLARITY – which permits intravital live imaging, high resolution 3D images of whole tissues/samples.

2015

The school coordinated and hosted the 2015 Merial–NIH National Veterinary Scholar Symposium – Solving Complex Challenges at the Interface of Humans, Animals and their Environment. The 3-day event was attended by 450 students and 150 faculty from across the country. The keynote speech, “The Killer Defense” was presented by Nobel Laureate Peter Doherty.


2015

Veterinary, engineering and agricultural students collaborated to create the Pastured Poultry Farm. The students built the Eggmobile (a miniature 32-nest chicken barn on wheels) to shelter the 150 chickens and fertilize the grass as it travels around the pasture. The goal is to improve pasture-based poultry farms, integrate crop and poultry farms, and research chicken health, diseases, predators and workers’ occupational health hazards. Each week 800 eggs are produced which are donated to the Yolo County Food Bank for community support.


2015

A UC Davis team of 12 faculty and staff, led by the school’s Western Institute for Food Safety and Security, participated in an international Symposium on One Health and Food Safety with faculty and students from Nanjing Agricultural University in China.


2015

The school and the Farm Foundation brought together the state’s livestock and poultry producers for a one-day workshop on antibiotic use in livestock and the expanded role of veterinarians to oversee and administer antibiotics. Faculty teach proper use of antibiotics to veterinary students, and pursue evidence-based science on the ethical, and proper use of antimicrobials in food animals. New FDA guidelines require changes to the use of antibiotics in livestock and poultry to begin addressing the growing antibiotic-resistance-related infections which kill 23,000 people and sicken millions each year.

2016

2016

The UC Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine is again Ranked No. 1 in veterinary science by the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings, widely considered to be one of the most influential international university rankings providers based on scholarly metrics.


2016

The 30th Annual Charles Heumphreus Memorial Lecture was held January 23, 2016. This was the first endowed lecture series established at the school which over the years is has provided an opportunity for farriers and veterinarians to share insights and collaborate on industry best practices in equine podiatry.


2016

Dr. Jonna Mazet heads up a global group, PREDICT, whose researchers and scientists have helped identify more than 800 viruses worldwide that have the potential to “spill over” from wildlife to humans -- from Ebola to West Nile to Zika. The initial 5-year grant was funded at $75 million and renewed in 2014 for an additional 5 years at $100 million.


2016

The ground-breaking research on the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of chronic stomatitis in cats resulted in one patent and two publications. The current clinical trials were expanded to a two-center trial with Cornell University, and efforts are also being made to bring this therapy to a human clinical trial.


2016

Clinical Pathology has obtained a new 10-head multi-headed microscope to assist in education. A faculty member can “drive” the scope and show nine students/residents/other faculty what they are seeing on each slide, providing real-time education.


2016

Picnic Day efforts at the veterinary hospital were a huge success. For the first time in many years the hospital team organized tours, booths, engaging displays and demonstrations - providing a view into veterinary medicine. 500 visitors of all ages, many prospective students and parents, took tours in groups of 25.


2016

The Clinical Cardiology Laboratory was established under the Direction of Dr. Lance Visser. This new space provides additional equipment and resources to complete cutting-edge clinical trial research, an area where the cardiology team is heavily involved. The addition of this laboratory makes UC Davis one of only a handful of locations with both a molecular and clinical cardiology research space that bring cutting-edge medical information to clinical patients before it is even published.


2016

Equine surgeons Jorge Nieto and Julie Dechant worked with small animal surgeon Bill Culp to successfully implant the first urethral stent for the treatment of a urethral stricture in a stallion.


2016

The Million Cat Challenge, a partnership with the University of Florida Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program, passed the halfway milestone, marking 500,000 lives saved by the more than 1,000 shelters enrolled in the challenge. The program's goal is to save one million cat lives in 5 years by focusing on five key initiatives: Alternatives to Intake; Managed Admission; Capacity for Care; Removing Barriers to Adoption; and Return to Field.


2016

Dr. Jane Sykes appointed as the Chief Veterinary Medical Officer of the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital and as Associate Dean of Veterinary Medical Center Operation. She has responsibility for the management and fiscal integrity of the veterinary hospital, ensuring the academic quality of the clinical learning environment for DVM students and house officers and provision of state-of-the-art clinical care.


2016

Equine Ophthalmology hired a dedicated equine ophthalmologist, Dr. Mary Lassaline. The service now has six permanent faculty, which is the largest of any ophthalmology team in North America.


2016

The Zoological Medicine Service provided state-of-the-art care to the animals at the Sacramento Zoo, including the first birth of a giraffe at the zoo in nearly 30 years.


2016

Radiation Oncology team implemented a specialized type of radiation called stereotactic radiotherapy to treat more than two dozen dogs and cats with brain tumors.


2016

The Companion Exotic Animal Medicine and Surgery Service treated 2,300 companion animals and wildlife, including 250+ different species or breeds of birds, rabbits, ferrets, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, non-human primates, marsupials and fish presented as primary care appointments, referrals and more than 730 emergencies. Faculty and residents also published 26 articles in peer-reviewed journals, 12 book chapters, gave more than 40 presentations at continuing education events or scientific national/international conferences, and received more than $60,000 in research grants.


2016

The Hemodialysis and Blood Purification Service hosted the 2016 IRIS Renal Week symposium at UC Davis. The week-long program devoted to nephrology and extracorporeal therapies attracted more than 140 attendees from around the world for state-of-the-art lectures and interactive laboratories presented by an internationally renowned faculty.


2016

The Zoological Medicine Service, in collaboration with the Anatomic Pathology Service, discovered a new amdoparvovirus in red pandas.


2016

Dr. Chris Barker, leads a team working to design computer models based on satellite observations provided by NASA in the hopes of gaining a better understanding of the threat posed to the U.S. by mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, Chikungunya and dengue.


2016

Dr. Isaac Pessah, working with collaborators from the Institute for Neurosciences in Gernoble France and the Pasteur Institute in Tunisia, has conducted research that shows that a particular family of toxins, the calcins, found in some scorpion venom, might also have a unique beneficial function. The toxic peptide is not supposed to get inside cells, but it does and then is phosphorylated, which not only neutralizes its toxicity, but also reprograms its activity to be beneficial. Ultimately this discovery could help to develop a novel strategy to control ryanodine receptor channels that leak calcium—known to contribute to a number of human and animal diseases.


2016

At the Evening of Gratitude event the school brought together donors and student scholarship recipients to recognize the school’s philanthropic partners and their contributions to the success of the school and our students. Another record year – the school distributed $2.5 million in scholarships and another $4.2 million in grants to students. Twenty six alumni classes have established endowed scholarships.


2016

The Class of 2016 included an honorary degree for “Dr. Teddy,” a 19-year-old Thoroughbred horse, recognized for being a “Master Equine Educator” for the students. Dr. Teddy has helped members of the class learn equine health at more than two dozen appointments and a lengthy stay at the teaching hospital.


2016

Dr. Pamela Hullinger appointed Director of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (CAHFS) has the leadership responsibility to ensure the capability of providing complete and timely diagnostic services with state of the art technology to control transboundary animal disease and other diseases that threaten the viability of California livestock and poultry industries.


2016

The Mercer Vet Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless opened their new facility in Sacramento recently; now known as the "Tom Kendall Teaching Clinic." This volunteer clinic, started in 1992 by our students, addresses a critical societal need, provides students a real world learning experience and honors a long-time colleague for his commitment to both the clinic and teaching students.


2016

The school is once again leading the nation's veterinary schools in total extramural contracts and grant funding at $75,747,241 well ahead of the second highest funded school.


2016

Forty-eight students presented their summer research projects at the annual Students Training in Advanced Research poster session event on August 26th. The program offers funding opportunities on a competitive basis to veterinary students to experience veterinary and biomedical research during the summer months.


2016

The Alex A. Ardans Tulare Branch Laboratory of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System was officially dedicated October 28th, honoring the outstanding contributions of former director and long-time faculty member Alex Ardans, an expert in the field of veterinary diagnostics. Ardans oversaw the operational transition of the laboratory system from the state to the school, and he led the subsequent successful partnership between the school and CDFA for more than two decades.


2016

Gorilla Doctors, part of the school’s One Health Institute, were subject of a featured story on the CBS show “60 Minutes” on October 9th. There are only about 950 mountain gorillas left on Earth. Habitat loss, poaching, and disease have made them one of the most endangered animals alive. But their numbers are rising, thanks in large part to Gorilla Doctors. A team has 16 doctors who operate all across the gorilla’s territory, a vast rainforest that spans three countries -- Rwanda, Uganda and the DRC, the Democratic Republic of Congo.


2016

The veterinary hospital acquired a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, becoming the first veterinary facility in the world to utilize the imaging technology for equine patients; for research and clinical studies on lameness diagnosis in horses.


2016

Veterinary professor Robert Brosnan developed patent-pending technology in hopes of discovering safer, and more cost-effective general anesthetics for both animals and people. General anesthetics have been used in surgery for 170 years, but anesthetics haven’t changed markedly since before the U.S. Civil War. He’s now working with a biomedical startup company that has raised more than $1 million toward revolutionizing anesthesia.


2016

Hannah Laurence, third year veterinary student, completed a year-long program as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellow (one of 68 in the nation). The biomedical research study she participated in recently appeared in the journal Science, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


2016

The J.D. Wheat Veterinary Orthopedic Research Laboratory team has discovered that the majority of catastrophic racing and training bone fractures and joint injuries have pre-existing bone remodeling or stress fractures at the site of their fatal injury--meaning, catastrophic injuries are preventable.


2016

After more than 50 years of research, the tick-borne bacterium responsible for “foothill abortion disease,” one of the most devastating cattle diseases in the Western United States, has been named and genetically characterized by school researchers as “Pajaroellobacter abortibovis.”


2016

Veterinary and medical students team up to offer monthly clinics for the animals and people of Knights Landing and Robbins, two small rural communities in Yolo County. The clinics, located across the street from each other, provide the community with health care services and inform the students about health topics that impact both people and their pets.