One Health Institute Calvin Schwabe Project

Photo: One Health Globe


The overarching goal of the Calvin Schwabe One Health Project is to prepare a new generation of veterinary practitioners who are educated and skilled in a broad arena that includes not only traditional clinical animal medicine, but also public health and ecosystem conservation.

One Health Project

PROFILE
The need for veterinarians in public practice, comparative research, and food and production medicine continues unabated. By virtue of their education in comparative medicine, preventive research, and zoonotic training, veterinarians already work at the interface of human, animal, and environmental health. The incoming generation of veterinary students should be supported and encouraged to become practitioners of the future by expanding their training to include the One Health approach. The unique challenges facing the world today mean that practitioners of the future need to be prepared to think and strategize with their science colleagues, create team solutions, and problem-solve as a global unit on behalf of the changing planet. Food, water, and soil safety have become paramount, as have zoonotic disease challenges and environmental shifts. Without the strong basis of a healthy environment, there is no hope of maintaining the health of living beings.

ROLE OF THIS PROJECT
Over the past century, veterinary medicine has excelled in producing practitioners who possess expertise in clinical medicine for individual animal patients. As a consequence of this emphasis, more than 75 percent of graduates currently practice clinical medicine for small or large animals. But today, due to sobering global challenges—land and climatic shifts, globalization, urbanization, human population footprints, food and water safety, bio-event threats, pollution, and emerging zoonotic diseases, to name a few—veterinarians are needed to fill roles broader than that of the "small-animal doctor."

The overarching goal of the Calvin Schwabe One Health Project is to prepare a new generation of veterinary practitioners who are educated and skilled in a broad arena that includes not only traditional clinical animal medicine, but also public health and ecosystem conservation.

PROJECT GOALS

In the short term, one main priority of the One Health Project is to support veterinary students' pursuit of "one health" experiences (externships) while in school. These externships consist of student-created projects in areas addressing such One Health concerns as public health, zoonotic diseases, food safety, ecosystem conservation, wildlife health, bio-threats, disaster medicine, antibiotic resistance consequences, and environmental degradation and repair.

The heart of the Calvin Schwabe project is its adaptability. Plans include the creation of One Health internships, fellowships, and post-graduate positions in the discipline, with the aim of transitioning practitioners into One Health careers, but the overall project is nimble and dynamic. It will evolve as the landscape of One Health itself evolves, identifying and incorporating ever-emerging opportunities in the field.

While recognizing that no single individual or program can solve all of these problems easily or swiftly, the project offers several means for preparing the next generation of veterinarians to meet these challenges:

  • Support student learning experiences in the One Health discipline in the form of externships, internships, and post-graduate fellowships
  • Support career-diversity goals within veterinary education
  • Help veterinary students secure careers in One Health
  • Advocate for and support veterinarians in rural health and veterinary public health
  • Provide debt relief for expanded graduate education in preventive medicine, public health, epidemiology, and ecology through the MPVM, MPH, and PhD programs
  • Establish partnerships with physicians, nurses, public health practitioners, environmental and ecosystem scientists, global educators, and public policy experts in order to strengthen the One Health goal of transdisciplinary collaboration.

THE UC DAVIS ENVIRONMENT

For more than a decade, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine has been a devoted advocate of the "One Health" philosophy. The campus is unique in this country not only in housing medical and veterinary-medicine schools, a law school, and a new nursing school, but also in offering the only MPVM (Masters of Preventive Veterinary Medicine) program in the nation.

UC Davis also offers a strong MPH (Masters of Public Health) degree as well as degrees in wildlife, ecology, and environmental resources.

By integrating these resources, UC Davis is leading a nationwide shift toward multidisciplinary collaboration among scientists.

Special Recognition and THANKS To:

Calvin Schwabe Project creator: Dr. Cheryl Scott
Edits: Sandy Shanks and Nicole Parizeau - Art: Bob Cordrey and Stefan Gutermuth