Team Members - 2014-2015

From left to right: Owen Cortner (IAD student), Ryen Morey, Laura Schwartz, Belinda Richardson (IAD student), Molly Liepnieks, Carolina Vicario, Rebeccah Landman, Sam Lawton, Laura Budd, Hannah MacDonald, Ashley Felhofer (Undergraduate), Lauren Michaels, Karen Sorenson - (All unspecified students are DVM candidates)

Karen Sorenson

Karen Sorenson

I am a third year veterinary student with a passion for the One Health. One of my favorite aspects of our project is its interdisciplinary nature. In addition to working with and learning from other veterinary students and faculty, we also collaborate closely with our colleagues in the medical school, the International Agricultural Development group and various other specialties. This makes for wonderful opportunities to exchange ideas and elevate the quality of our work. The network of support that we maintain here in Davis is mirrored in Sabana Grande, where we work closely with skilled community members who contribute a vast knowledge of animal and human health, agriculture and conservation.

My experiences so far on this project have vastly improved the quality of my education, my professional skills and my level of awareness of One Health concerns in the global arena. I look forward to helping this project progress and seeing where it goes next.

Carolina Vicario

Carolina Vicario

In my third year of veterinary school, I have found myself focusing my time and passion on an approach that a few years ago I didn’t even know existed- One Health! Analyzing the overlap of human, animal and environmental health is fundamental to my contributions to our project. We are continuing our partnership with the community of Sabana Grande to identify and prioritize the health needs of cattle and chicken (valuable sources of food and family income). As one of the Project Directors, I am continuously gaining project management and communication skills that I will carry with me beyond graduation. Working closely on this team has brought me my best friends in vet school, and I am so thankful for the unique responsibilities and opportunities we have sought in this project.

About me: I studied biology at Claremont McKenna College, and completed my senior thesis research in neuroscience. In the past, working in a student-run (human) free clinic, and a (veterinary) small animal hospital in southern California were both integral in my decision to study medicine. Today, our multidisciplinary project in Nicaragua is awakening my interest in global health. I was raised in a bicultural U.S.-Argentine household, and I appreciate the value of immersion in cultures different than my own. Sabana Grande, a beautiful, rural town in Nicaragua hosts unique opportunities for both professional and personal growth. I am excited to continue developing this project in conjunction with my inspirational classmates and partners in Nicaragua!

Laura Budd

Laura Budd

I am a second year veterinary student with a deep desire to improve animal health as well as human health and livelihoods. I am particularly intrigued with the unique role veterinarians can play at this interface.The interdependence of human, animal, and environmental health was a concept revealed to me during some of my international experiences prior to vet school, but it wasn’t until I was applying to vet school that I heard that idea given the name ‘One Health’. The One Health Nicaragua project has been such a wonderful opportunity to engage with students across disciplines and learn together how to incorporate the philosophy of One Health into international development and our own educations.

About me: I grew up in Vermont and graduated from Middlebury College. I studied biology in college, with a particular focus on ecology and conservation biology. I have worked on numerous ecology research projects from islands in the Gulf of Maine to Kruger National Park in South Africa. After college I worked for a year in a region of Kenya where people, their livestock, and wildlife interacted on a daily basis and were often competing for limited resources. It became very apparent to me that the health all three populations are be intertwined. My desire to solve problems at this interface had led me to the Students for One Health club at UC Davis and this Nicaragua project.

Sam Lawton

Sam Lawton

I am very excited to be part of the 2014-2015 Nicaragua team! Currently in my second year of veterinary school, I am still eagerly exploring all aspects of veterinary medicine, but my experiences with One Health Nicaragua have convinced me that conservation medicine or global health are where I want to focus my future efforts. During my undergraduate degree I studied global health and had the opportunity to travel to Belize. While in Belize I stayed in two remote villages where I realized the importance of the local domestic and wild animals to the survival of people. Additionally, the land itself was invaluable as both farming and foraging land. I began to realize that human health is dependent on animal and environmental health and I decided I wanted to address these areas in international development. I then began to study conservation biology and eventually veterinary medicine, while still trying to grow my understanding of the human needs that must be met during the design of land or animal conservation programs. Being involved with the One Health Nicaragua project allows me to work with students from other disciplines that are more knowledgeable about human behavior and environmental science than I, and I enjoy learning from my peers throughout this experience.

I am honored to be part of the SOH Nicaragua project because of its focus on evidence-based activities, local partnership, and sustainability. I am eager to continue working with the local health workers to develop a multispecies-focused, preventative health strategy based on local resources and capabilities and to see One Health strategies in action.