Residency Program in Large Animal Medicine: Livestock Emphasis

RESIDENCY PROGRAM IN LARGE ANIMAL MEDICINE: LIVESTOCK EMPHASIS

  • To provide advanced training in large animal medicine of the broadest scope, involving all large animal species, with an emphasis on food animal species.
  • To provide clinical teaching experience.
  • To provide appropriate experience in the design and implementation of an investigative project in a clinically related area.
  • To work with Board Certified faculty and to prepare residents for Board Certification in Internal Medicine (ACVIM).
  • To develop expertise in clinical large animal medicine, food animal surgery, and reproduction.

Justification
Excellence in livestock practice and herd health management is based upon the practice of high quality diagnostics, medicine, surgery and utilization of computerized records. Treatment of diseases in small ruminants is an important aspect of many livestock practices. Internal medicine of large animal species is a recognized clinical specialty. The clinical training program described herein is designed to produce veterinary internists who are trained in a wide scope of livestock medicine and surgery, and to allow the resident to fulfill the requirements for ACVIM certification. The program stresses clinical case management. Some aspects of production medicine are introduced, especially in the areas of reproduction, calf health and milk quality, in the problem-solving of referred medicine cases, and utilization of computerized records. Graduates should be well prepared for clinical academic positions, industry, practice and federal agencies.

Qualifications
Applicants for a residency in Large Animal Medicine: Livestock Emphasis must have a DVM or equivalent degree and must have completed a one-year internship or comparable post-graduate training or practice experience.

Duration
The duration of the residency program is 3 years. Renewal for the second and third years will be contingent upon satisfactory performance. The resident may be able to continue in a Master's or PhD program in an area of interest following completion of the residency. Funding for such a program is secured through extramural grant requests and is not part of residency funding.

General Scope and Nature of Training
First Year Program:

  • The resident is provided one month of scheduled paid vacation. The remaining 11 months are allocated approximately as follows: 5-6 months in the in-clinic Food Animal Medicine and Surgery Service, 1 month in radiology/ultrasound, 2 months in the Livestock Reproduction and Herd Health Service, 1-2 months in the Equine Medicine Service, and 1 month of professional development time out of clinics. Residents shall have primary patient care responsibilities, under the supervision of a senior clinician, and will develop an understanding of the general concepts of disease processes and case management in cattle, goats, sheep, pigs, and to a lesser extend, horses. This will include management of routine cases as well as referred cases. Since the case load will involve several species of large animals and problems involving all body systems, the clinical exposure should develop the broadest possible competency. Skill with the use of ultrasound will be developed both for pregnancy diagnosis and to aid with medical diagnoses. Ancillary facilities such as radiology are frequently used. Management of livestock surgical cases by the resident will develop surgical proficiency. Initially, surgical procedures will be performed with a senior clinician. As proficiency is gained by the resident, the routine procedures will be performed autonomously. Full and complete competency in all routine and special diagnostic procedures will be developed. Another primary objective will be the development of clinical maturity and judgment.
  • Residents will gain experience in evaluating reproductive problems and in the management of reproduction programs on large dairy farms, sheep flocks, and goat herds. Residents will acquire palpation skills, skills with ultrasound, and gain experience in the surgical treatment of male reproductive problems. Residents will become familiar with and have limited responsibility for computerized data storage and retrieval, calf health monitoring and milk quality.
  • Residents will have the opportunity to develop their teaching skills and will have a major role as clinical instructors. This duty will be performed, in part, by assisting in the tutorial teaching of first, second, third and senior veterinary students and conducting clinic rounds. Experience lecturing to large groups will be provided in the seminar/rounds format. Residents will receive assistance and guidance in the preparation and delivery of peer reviewed literature and lectures.
  • Residents will develop the ability to critically evaluate veterinary literature and will obtain the broad scientific base which is critical to an understanding of medical problems. The resident is encouraged to use the medical library and computer-assisted learning programs, and to attend as many campus seminars as possible. A trip to a major meeting such as the AABP or ACVIM is encouraged and funding may be provided from resident training funds to help defray expenses. When scheduling trips, priority is given to second and third year residents when conflicts arise.
  • Residents share out-of-hours emergency duty on a rotational basis.

Second and Third Year Programs

  • Duties will be similar to those of the first year, but with increasing responsibility for patient management. Residents will have some supervisory responsibility for training and supervision of first-year residents. One month of paid vacation is allowed each year. The second year resident will have 1 to 2 months and the third-year resident 2 months of out-of-clinics professional development time for research and studying (in addition to 1 month vacation). Professional development time is to allow the resident time to complete projects and prepare for Large Animal Specialty Board Examinations.
  • Residents will develop expertise in a specific area of internal medicine. Residents will be encouraged to attend and participate in seminars and conferences oriented toward their particular areas of special interest. Guidance in the development of this special area of expertise shall be the responsibility of the Chief of Service or another medicine service faculty member with allied interests.
  • The second and third year residents will be required to undertake an investigational project in some phase of livestock medicine. The project should have approval from the Chief of Service. Publication of a paper in a refereed journal is expected. Second and third year residents must present (oral presentation) research study findings at the VMTH House Officer Seminar Day program, and are encouraged to present a paper at the annual ACVIM Meeting.
  • Residents share out-of-hours emergency duty on a rotational basis.

The VMTH is committed to building strong relationships with its constituents. A major part of the residents duties, therefore, includes timely communication with referring veterinarians and clients.

FOR APPLICATION PROCEDURES AND OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE RESIDENCY PROGRAM, PLEASE SEE GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE VMTH WEB SITE

SELECTION WILL BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE GUIDELINES OF THE VETERINARY INTERNSHIP/RESIDENCY MATCHING PROGRAM.

 

 The University of California, Davis, and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital are interested in candidates who are committed to the highest standards of scholarship and professional activities, and to the development of a campus climate that supports equality and diversity.

ALL RESIDENTS ARE STRONGLY ADVISED TO OBTAIN A CALIFORNIA LICENSE WITHIN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE RESIDENCY IN ORDER TO WRITE PRESCRIPTIONS.

RESIDENTS MUST BE ABLE TO ARRIVE AT THE HOSPITAL WITHIN 15 MINUTES OF AN EMERGENCY CALL, THEREFORE, RESIDENTS MUST PLAN TO LIVE WITHIN 15 MILES OF THE HOSPITAL.

SPECIAL NOTE: As of mid-2017, the California Veterinary Medical Board will require all veterinarians working at the University of California, Davis with primary patient care duties to hold a special University license. To obtain this University license, veterinarians that are not licensed in the state of California will be required to take a 3-day course on regionally-important diseases and a short open-book jurisprudence test, in addition to being background checked. The course will be given on-site at the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine early in the course of your training program (dates to be determined). The cost of licensure will be the responsibility of the trainee (currently $290). This limited license only permits individuals to work in California as veterinarians for University-related practice. Although veterinarians that do not have hands-on patient care duty (e.g., anatomic pathologists, clinical pathologists) are not required to hold this license, obtaining the license is encouraged whenever your activities may have an impact on animal-owning members of the public. If in doubt, please contact the Office of the CVMO for clarification.

This position is a critical position and subject to a background check. Employment is contingent upon successful completion of background investigation including criminal history and identity checks.