Case Studies In Small Animal

Cardiovascular Medicine

Home Up 1    Pleural Fluid 2              Cough 3   Heart Murmur 4           Syncope 5       Tachypnea 6           Cyanosis 7   Heart Murmur 8   Heart Murmur 9              Cough 10    Heart Failure 11              Ascites 12    Pleural Fluid 13           Syncope 14     Bradycardia 15     Tachycardia 16                Blind 17   Heart Murmur 18   Resp. Distress 19        Collapsing 20    Heart Failure 21          Paralysis 22    New Murmur 23              Cough 24          Vomiting 25       Tachypnea 26   Heart Murmur 27      Hemoptysis 28  Limb Swelling 29  Heart Murmur 30 Acute Collapse 31 Enlarged Heart 32               Blind 33             Cough 34         Collapse 35         Collapse 36 Thromboembolus 37  Heart Murmur 38  Heart Murmur

ECG

Case 15

Presenting Complaint

bulletRecheck skin and ears

Signalment

bulletNine-year-old MC golden retriever weighing 42 kg ("Mac")

History

bulletThis dog has a long history of problems including ventral slot surgery for a type II cervical disk protrusion at C6-7, right front leg lameness (no radiographic changes), seborrhea oleosa, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (increased urine protein/creatinine ratio), urinary tract infection, and hypothyroidism.
bulletHe is here today to get his skin and ears rechecked.
bulletHe is on prednisolone therapy for suspected cervical neuritis causing his right front leg lameness.

Physical Examination

bulletT: 101.4; Resp: Pant; Heart rate: 126
bulletGeneral condition: Bright, alert, and happy
bulletSkin: Skin around head and neck not as thick as last recheck exam. Seborrhea still present
bulletMusculoskeletal: No lameness noted. Dog is moving freely.
bulletNo other abnormalities noted.

Plan

bulletMac will stay over night for a therapeutic bath tomorrow.

Comments

bulletAt 7:00 PM the ward technician found Mac collapsed in his cage. He was taken to ICU where a tachycardia was identified. His mucous membranes were white and his capillary refill time was prolonged. His femoral pulse was very weak to nonexistent. An ECG was obtained (next page).

 

Mark D. Kittleson, D.V.M., Ph.D. All rights reserved.