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Dr. Murray B. Gardner honored with 2013 Distinguished Service Award

Dr. Murray B. Gardner, MD, received a School of Veterinary Medicine 2013 Distinguished Service Award at a faculty reception on Oct 30th for his outstanding service spanning three decades in support of veterinary pathology education, comparative animal/human research, leadership in animal and animal model research, vision and contributions to the Center for Comparative Medicine, support of seminar speakers and symposia, and his professional contributions to the veterinary medical profession.

Dr. Gardner, professor emeritus, has been a stellar member of the Center for Comparative Medicine’s academic team since its inception in 1997.  As a School of Medicine faculty member, he brought his expertise and enthusiasm to this joint medicine/veterinary medicine center, where he lead research investigations and teaching efforts with veterinary and medical students.  He has more than 150 peer-reviewed publications on topics such as: cancer, immunodeficiency diseases and neurological diseases.  

Dr. Gardner led the animal and animal model research group studying AIDS in nonhuman primates at the California National Primate Research Center from 1982-1996.  He served as a mentor for many veterinary scientists who went on to notable careers themselves.  He was the principal investigator of large multi-disciplinary NIH research grants studying AIDS and on an NIH training grant that supported several DVM graduate students.

In 2006, the veterinary community demonstrated their high regard for his professional contributions by electing him as an Honorary Member of the American College of Veterinary Pathology.  His commitment to veterinary pathology education was excellent.  He was an enthusiastic participant in the weekly veterinary diagnostic pathology conferences where he often drew correlations between animal and human diseases. He also maintained, annotated and organized a valuable collection of almost 1,000 slides representing the cases discussed at these weekly conferences over the past six years.