News & Events

LEARN HOW ANIMAL HEALTH PRACTITIONERS IMPACT PUBLIC POLICY

August 13, 2007

Agricultural producers, veterinarians and other professionals from animal-related fields who want a deeper understanding of how animal health public policy is formed are invited to enroll in "Science, Politics, Beliefs and Animal Health Policy," September 27–29, 2007 at UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California.

This short course is the first in a 3-part series on public policy and the role of the animal health professional. Participants learn the distinctive roles of science, public opinion, and legislation in shaping laws, regulations and policies affecting the animal health system. Presenters outline strategies and tactics for the development of policy that addresses issues such as tracing food products from farm to table, navigating drug and vaccine approval processes, and planning for emerging threats to public health. This first course combines lectures, a visit to the California State Capitol, first-hand exposure to the legislative process, and case examples. The two other courses take place in Washington, DC (March 2008) and Paris, France (January 2009).

"Science, Politics, Beliefs and Animal Health Policy" is appropriate for animal producers, animal scientists, wildlife biologists, and veterinarians in public or private practice. The course fee is $295 before 8/31 or $395 after 8/31. The fee includes 15 units of Continuing Professional Education credit.

Partners include the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine, the Center for Animal Health and Food Safety, Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges.

To register, please visit http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/CE/publicpolicy.html, or contact mailto:center4ce@ucdavis.edu.

UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine serves California and beyond through statewide teaching, research and service programs that benefit animal health, protect public health, and enhance environmental health.