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Jane Goodall, Vets, Zoos: UC Davis TV Production Now Online

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Today’s zoo veterinarian serves as both doctor and defender, as School of Veterinary Medicine wildlife veterinarians Ray Wack and Scott Larsen can testify. Wack and Larsen are the attending vets at the Sacramento Zoo. Wack and Larsen, and the challenges they face, are the focus of a documentary, “Captive Audience,” that premiered June 18 as a segment of “ViewFinder” on KVIE-TV, Sacramento’s PBS station. The show, produced by the UC Davis News Service, explores the important role that zoos are playing in wildlife conservation and how veterinarians and conservation experts are debating big questions.

Viewers can watch the program through several avenues:

UC Davis Spotlight provides information, online viewing and video "extras" on the UC Davis Web site. You can purchase a copy of the DVD at this site, too. 

UCTV will premiere the program September 15. For air dates and times on your cable or satellite system, as well as an option to watch online anytime ("on demand: viewing is available about two weeks after the premiere), follow this link: http://www.uctv.tv/search-details.asp?showID=15133

KVIE TV 6 Public Television in Sacramento shows an encore performance on "ViewFinder," September 10 at 7:00 p.m.

UC Davis You Tube online


The Sacramento Zoo and UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine benefit from a long-standing partnership of service, education and scholarship. The zoo's animals are a focal point for providing veterinary students with hands-on education ever since Dr. Murray Fowler established the first zoo medicine programs and courses. The zoo is also an essential component of the school's zoological medicine residency, a three-year training program for veterinarians who want to specialize in a practice with zoo or wildlife species.

Case studies and veterinary investigations of exotic animals reported by faculty experts and resident veterinarians expand our knowledge of zoo animal health and its role in wildlife conservation. Finally, the zoo's animals benefit from on-site veterinary care services, wellness programs developed by zoo vets, and the many diagnostic and treatment resources of the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in Davis.