Archived News

House Officers Present Research Studies


March 18, 2016

House Officers presented 34 research studies at the 38th Annual Gerald V. Ling House Officer Seminar Day.

House Officers presented 34 research studies at the 38th Annual Gerald V. Ling House Officer Seminar Day.

UC Davis veterinary hospital house officers (interns, fellows, residents) presented their research studies at the 38th Annual Gerald V. Ling House Officer Seminar Day. The day-long event featured short presentations to fellow house officers, faculty, staff, students and guests.

Having the ability to do research is a major advantage of participating in an advanced training program at UC Davis. With the largest and most diverse house officer program in the country, the UC Davis veterinary hospital is able to offer research opportunities not available elsewhere.

This year, 34 studies covered a huge breadth of topics including:
•    Preliminary evaluation of the effect of acupuncture on acoustic electromyographic recordings of the middle gluteal muscle in five sport horses
•    Cardiac troponin I in neonatal thoroughbred foals with rib fractures
•    Factors affecting outcome of ultrasound-guided radiofrequency heat ablation for treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism in dogs
•    Evaluation of the use of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy in dogs with primary lung tumors
•    Efficacy and pharmacokinetics of intravenous famotidine in adult cattle
•    Clinical application of cone beam computed tomography in rabbits
•    Retrospective evaluation of prognostic factors and outcome for mediastinal lymphoma in dogs
•    Association between canine pancreas-specific lipase and outcomes of dogs with hemodialysis-dependent acute kidney injury
•    Prevalence and prognostic implications of circulating nucleated red blood cells in cats

Because of the hospital’s high patient caseload (more than 50,000 per year), UC Davis is able to offer one of the most advanced clinical training experiences for house officer veterinarians anywhere in the world. While internships and fellowships generally last a year or less, a residency allows for veterinarians to attend a three- to four-year specialty training program under the tutelage of the world’s leading veterinary specialists. Upon completion of a residency program and passing of examinations, these veterinarians become board-certified specialists in their particular field of interest, thusly opening doors to many new career opportunities.

UC Davis currently trains 109 house officers from 21 states and 20 countries (6 continents).