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UC Davis Veterinary Student Elected President of National Board Focused on Diversity

Ruth Goins, a second year DVM student at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, was recently elected president of the Veterinarians as One Inclusive Community for Empowerment (VOICE), a student-led organization promoting diversity. With diversity-building experience from a previous position, as well as her current presidency of a local VOICE chapter, Goins looks to continue that leadership as she transitions to the national level this fall.

Following Six Months of Recovery at UC Davis, Severely Burned Cat Gets Adopted

More than six months after being severely burned in California’s North Complex Fire, a cat treated at the UC Davis veterinary hospital has finally fully recovered and found his forever home. In the fall of 2020, thousands of animals were affected by the fire, and Jam, an approximately 2-year-old male cat, suffered some of the most horrific injuries of any of them.

One Health Collaboration Spotlights Disparities in Knee and Jaw Joint Treatments

There are many similarities between the usage, and consequent injury, in knee joints and the jaw’s temporomandibular joint (TMJ). However, knee orthopedics are better researched and funded, resulting in tissue-engineered products and other ways to improve the lives of those affected. Dr. Boaz Arzi, professor and dentist/maxillofacial surgeon with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, joined biomedical engineers and orthopedic surgeons from UC Irvine, orthopedic surgeons from Harvard University, oral/maxillofacial surgeons from the University of Texas, and oral/maxillofacial radiologists to research the subject further.

A Beer Named Floyd

Floyd was a ball fanatic with the heart of a retriever. The muscular black and white Boston terrier would play fetch for hours with Ananda and Chuck Nettnins before collapsing in his water trough to cool off.

A few months after his death in April 2016 from hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the vascular endothelium or the blood vessel walls, the Nettnins discovered a secret stash of more than 20 balls hidden under their couch.

Where Coronavirus Variants Emerge, Surges Follow

Genomic surveillance programs have let scientists track the coronavirus over the course of the pandemic. By testing patient samples, researchers are able to diagnose COVID-19. But they’re also able to use genetic changes in the virus to recreate its travel routes and identify the emergence of new viral variants.

UC Davis Performs First 3D Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy in Veterinary Medicine

Louie, an 8-year-old male Boston terrier, was diagnosed with Cushing’s disease by his primary veterinarian. Cushing’s disease causes a dog’s adrenal glands to produce too much cortisol, a chemical that controls many aspects of a dog’s body, including its weight, its ability to fight infections, maintain blood sugar levels, and many other vital functions. In Louie, the Cushing’s disease was caused by a tumor in his right adrenal gland. His primary veterinarians referred Louie to the Soft Tissue Surgery Service at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for surgical removal of his right adrenal gland.

Ranking Virus Spillover Risk

SpillOver, a new web application developed by UC Davis scientists, and contributed to by experts from all over the world, ranks the risk of wildlife-to-human spillover for newly discovered viruses.