Human & Animal Health

Celebrating National One Health Awareness Month in January

January 10, 2020
As we start a new decade, the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine is participating in a national campaign to promote the value of One Health, a collaborative approach to finding new solutions that benefit animal, human and environmental health.

Rectal Microbes Influence Effectiveness of HIV Vaccine

December 13, 2019
Microbes living in the rectum could make a difference to the effectiveness of experimental HIV vaccines, according to research led by Smita Iyer, assistant professor at the UC Davis Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases and School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Mapping the Pathway to Gut Health in HIV and SIV Infections

November 20, 2019
Katti (Horng) Crakes, doctoral student in the schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis, served as first author on a UC Davis research study that found that the damaged gut lining (known as leaky gut) in monkeys infected with chronic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an HIV-like virus, was rapidly repaired within five hours of receiving Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria. The outcome lends hope that leaky gut, a common condition among HIV patients, could be effectively treated in the future.

CAHFS Faculty Honored Distinguished Awards for Protecting Food and Animal Health

October 31, 2019

by Caitlin Khorey, Communications intern

Congratulations are due to Drs. Beate Crossley and Francisco Uzal who were recently honored with distinguished awards at the annual meeting of American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) and the United States Animal Health Association (USAHA). Crossley and Uzal are both faculty members with the school’s California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (CAHFS). 

New Approach for Canine Epilepsy

October 30, 2019
Researchers and clinicians at UC Davis veterinary hospital are evaluating a novel technique to better understand and treat canine epilepsy.

USAID Award Supports New $85M Project Led by UC Davis One Health Institute

October 25, 2019
The U.S. Agency for International Development will award up to $85 million over the next five years to the University of California, Davis’ One Health Institute and consortium partners to implement the One Health Workforce—Next Generation project.

MPVM Program Builds Knowledge and Connections

October 21, 2019

When Dr. Tapakorn Chamchoy began looking into programs that would give him solid training in statistical analysis and diagnostic test evaluation, he couldn’t imagine that would involve visiting California dairy farms to obtain fecal slurry samples. But that’s where his Master of Preventive Veterinary Medicine (MPVM) degree took him. 

UC Davis Receives $845 Million in Research Funding: Vet Med Garners Top Award

September 13, 2019
UC Davis nearly matched its record level of annual research funding in 2018-19, receiving $845.5 million in grants and contracts. Last year’s top award of $34.9 million from the California Department of Food and Agriculture went to the veterinary school's California Animal Health & Food Safety Laboratory System, which safeguards public health by providing diagnoses for animal diseases, including those affecting humans. 

How to Assess and Manage Wildlife Intrusion Risk on Your Farm

September 10, 2019
To protect the public from foodborne illness, vegetable growers must identify and manage against possible environmental sources of contamination — such as intrusion and defecation by wild animals — to ensure public health concerns remain minimal.

Wildfire and Health

June 25, 2019
As Californians have fled ferocious wildfires in recent years, UC Davis scientists, veterinarians, physicians and teachers have also been responding to that trauma: treating people and animals, investigating the effects on mental and physical health, and trying to discover what the future might hold as wildfires burn into towns and suburbs.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Risks Examined

May 20, 2019

In Mexicali, Mexico, an uncontrolled epidemic of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, one of the deadliest tickborne diseases in the Americas, has affected more than 1,000 people since 2008.

Pre-empting zoonotic disease threats

April 03, 2019
A multimillion-dollar Defense Department grant is helping veterinary researchers predict the emergence of highly pathogenic zoonotic viruses and prevent them spilling over to humans.

Scientists Discover Ebola Virus In West African Bat

January 25, 2019
The government of Liberia, in partnership with the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and EcoHealth Alliance, announced the discovery of Ebola virus in a bat in Liberia. This is the first finding of Zaire ebolavirus in a bat in West Africa, adding to other evidence suggesting bats serve as a natural wildlife reservoir for Ebola and other related viruses.

A Bulldog's Screw Tail Might Help Us Understand a Rare Genetic Disease in People

January 16, 2019
One of the most distinctive body parts of your typical English bulldog, French bulldog, or Boston terrier—their coiled screw tail—might be caused by a specific genetic mutation, suggests recent research. And more importantly for humans, that same genetic quirk might help scientists better understand a rare disorder in people.

Deadly Marburg Virus Found in Sierra Leone Bats

December 21, 2018
Scientists have discovered Marburg virus in fruit bats in Sierra Leone. This is the first time the deadly virus has been found in West Africa. Five Egyptian rousette fruit bats tested positive for active Marburg virus infection. Scientists caught the bats separately in three health districts: Moyamba, Koinadugu and Kono.