UC Davis Neurosurgeons Successfully Remove Brain Tumor, Extending Dog’s Life

June 04, 2018

Dazzy, a 4-year-old male French bulldog, began having seizures and acting aggressive toward strangers – a behavior he had never previously displayed. His owners took him to see their primary veterinarian who ultimately referred them to a neurologist near their home in Southern California. An MRI performed by the neurologist revealed a left intra-axial cerebral mass, most consistent with a glioma (brain tumor).

Successful Cancer Clinical Trial at UC Davis Extends Dog’s Life

May 05, 2018

Boone, a 9-year-old male greater Swiss mountain dog, was previously diagnosed with stage 3 malignant oral melanoma based on the size of the tumor and spread of the tumor to his lymph nodes. He participated in a clinical trial that has given him a new lease on life.

Lord Nelson (PICSI)

May 04, 2018

At midnight on a warm summer evening in the barns at the UC Davis veterinary hospital, a first in equine medicine at UC Davis occurred. As Dr. Bruce Christensen, chief of the hospital’s Equine Reproduction Service, watched on, a mare gave birth to the first foal ever born at UC Davis by in-vitro fertilization. Through intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), an in-vitro process of impregnating a mare was successful at the renowned veterinary school. This story’s origins, however, go back almost a quarter of a century.

Darla and Spanky

May 04, 2018

A pair of English bulldog puppies born with spina bifida are the first patients to be successfully treated with a unique therapy—a combination of surgery and stem cells—developed at UC Davis by a team of veterinary and human medicine researchers and clinicians.
Read Darla and Spanky's full story

Kabang

May 04, 2018

Kabang, a shepherd mix dog, was brought to UC Davis from the Philippines in October 2012 for surgery to repair massive facial wounds caused when her snout was torn from her face after being hit by a motorcycle. After arrival at UC Davis, it was discovered that she also had heartworm disease and a type of infectious cancer, known as a transmissible venereal tumor. Treatment for both of these health problems was necessary before dental and surgical procedures could be performed to deal with her facial wound.