Dialysis Saves Dog with Acute Kidney Injury

November 23, 2020

“Case of the Month” – November 2020

Daisy, an 8-year-old female collie/terrier mix, grew up in Malibu, so she loves the beach. She’s always been a well-seasoned beachgoer, prepared for anything that might come her way. But a recent trip to Pacifica Beach proved too much to handle after she ingested something that severely upset her system, nearly killing her.

Cat Burned in Wildfire Discharged After Three Months of Hospitalization

November 20, 2020
The UC Davis veterinary hospital has treated hundreds of animals over the years that were burned in wildfires. Every year, there is at least one that everyone at the hospital remembers. This year, one of the most memorable was Ned, a semi-feral cat who was rescued from the property he calls home a few days after the LNU Lightning Complex Fire swept through and destroyed everything. This week, Ned was finally discharged after being hospitalized for three months.

New Feline Facility Will Help Cats Live All Their Nine Lives

November 02, 2020

Sick cats at UC Davis now have a more dedicated space to recover. The Small Animal Clinic at the school’s veterinary hospital has opened a feline treatment and housing suite to better care for sick and injured cats. The new facility combines a hospitalization ward with examination and treatment space. Veterinarians and technicians laud the suite as the most efficient use of space and time in order to care for multiple hospitalized cats.

Oral Chemotherapy Helping Dog With Leukemia

October 14, 2020
Scruffles, a 9-year-old female Shetland sheepdog, was referred to the UC Davis veterinary hospital after her white blood cell count continued to increase. The Oncology Service performed complete blood count tests to gain a better understanding of Scruffles’ condition, as well as a test called flow cytometry, which helped determine if Scruffles was dealing with a cancer of her bone marrow (leukemia).

UC Davis Study Explores Kitten Stress Responses to Improve Welfare

October 07, 2020
Orphaned kittens experience more stress than kittens cared for by their mothers, according to a new UC Davis study. Understanding the effect of being orphaned on responses to stressful events could improve their care.

Kitten’s Collaborative Care Exemplifies UC Davis’ Campuswide Animal-Centered Spirit

September 10, 2020
So, what do a local university patron, four veterinary hospital services, a veterinary resident, a newly graduated Animal Science major, and dozens of faculty, staff, and student caregivers have in common? All of these UC Davis entities came together to save the life of a tiny kitten barely big enough to fit in your hand.

Dog Continues to Lead Full Life After Leg Amputation Due to Cancer

September 08, 2020
Kita, a 10-year-old female American Staffordshire terrier, began limping on her front right leg in November 2019. Shortly thereafter, she refused to walk at all. Her primary veterinarian diagnosed her with osteosarcoma in the leg. Her owners chose to have the leg amputated. Following amputation, Kita was referred to the UC Davis veterinary hospital for further recommendations on treating metastasis of the tumor.

UC Davis Aids Long-Serving K-9 Officer

September 01, 2020
Wildlife Officer Paul Cardoza, a game warden with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), refers to his partner, K-9 Kilo, as his most trusted piece of equipment. The pair have been together for 11 years. So, when Kilo, a 13-year-old male German shepherd/Belgian Malinois mix, was having trouble walking and supporting himself on his hind limbs, Cardoza sought out the specialists at the UC Davis veterinary hospital.

Philanthropic Partnership Aids in Cancer Care

August 24, 2020
Prince, a 9-year-old male standard poodle, was referred to the UC Davis veterinary hospital in 2017 for further evaluation of a lump on his right hind leg. His owner reported it has been there for about a year and had not changed in size.

Big Dogs Face More Joint Problems if Neutered Early

August 17, 2020
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study also provides guidance on best age to neuter mixed breeds by weight.