Large Animal

Feeding Waste Milk to Calves: Reducing Antimicrobial Resistance

June 07, 2018

An undesired consequence of the use of antimicrobial drugs in cattle is the presence of drug residues and/or metabolites in feces and urine, or in the milk of lactating animals. In lactating dairy cattle, this translates into production losses due to withholding of nonsaleable waste milk containing drug residues.
 

UC Davis Offers a DNA Test for Limbal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

May 04, 2018

Some eye diseases in horses might be genetically linked, as for example limbal squamous cell carcinoma in Haflingers. UC Davis is currently offering a DNA test for Haflingers to identify individuals with high risk and to apply this information to breeding programs to help nullify the genetic mutation.

Fish Skins Used on Acid Attack Pony in UK

May 02, 2018

A pony which was left with extensive facial burns in a suspected acid attack has undergone pioneering surgery at a Yorkshire horse hospital. Now, in a world first on a horse, vets have applied dressings made from the skin of tilapia fish to the wounds.

A Deadly Strain of Equine Herpes Virus

April 27, 2018

Any time a large group of horses gather in one place, there is a chance for a viral outbreak. One in particular that has affected a multitude of shows and facilities in the past decade is a neurological strain of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) known as equine herpes myeloencephalopathy (EHM).

Laceration Repair Surgery Saves Horse’s Athletic Career

February 09, 2018

Nash, a 12-year-old American Quarter Horse gelding, is a roping horse in local competitions and also works for his family herding cattle. That career was in jeopardy recently after suffering a severe laceration to his lower lip that extended back to his jawline. His owners Maureen and Brian searched Nash’s stall for evidence of how the injury happened. While not certain it was the cause, the only possible culprit they could find was a rough edge on a food bowl that they hadn’t noticed before.

UC Davis Helps Champion Roping Horse Return after Botulism Poisoning

November 01, 2017

John, an 11-year-old American Quarter Horse gelding, and his owner/rider Doug Parker worked for years to qualify for the World Series of Team Roping in Las Vegas. Just before that became a reality in 2016, however, John was stricken with botulism, a toxic poisoning that had already killed one of his stablemates. Mr. Parker, who knew the World Series was now out of the question, raced to the UC Davis veterinary hospital to save John’s life.

UC Davis Livestock Veterinarians Save Potbellied Pig

June 01, 2017

Pickles, a 5-month-old male potbellied pig, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital after he started coughing up blood and vomiting. He was diagnosed with an acute hemothorax (blood in the thoracic cavity) causing severe anemia and was extremely unstable. Treatment for suspected rodenticide intoxication was initiated immediately by the Livestock Medicine and Surgery Service.

Premature Foal Has Long Stay at UC Davis Veterinary Hospital

April 04, 2017

Brave, a newborn male foal, was born five weeks premature and immediately brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital with his dam, Ally, who was also experiencing a life threatening condition with uterine artery bleeding. Upon arrival, the colt was lethargic with diarrhea and mild colic. They were received by the Equine Internal Medicine and Equine Medical Emergency, Critical Care and Neonatology Services. A large team, led by a neonatal specialist, was quickly assembled to care for the pair. An initial physical exam in the Lucy Whittier Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) found signs consistent with a premature foal, pneumonia, and sepsis. Brave's long journey out of the NICU was just beginning.