Getting Bella Back on Her Feet

March 31, 2021
Bella, a 20-year-old miniature donkey jenny, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital for severe lameness and abnormally shaped hooves on all four feet.

Equine Specialists Host EHM Webinar for Veterinarians

March 29, 2021
On March 26, 2021, equine specialists from the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine's Center for Equine Health, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, and the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory joined with the California Department of Food and Agriculture to present “Update on Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy for Equine Practitioners.”

Team of Specialists Save Mare and Foal in Difficult Birth

February 25, 2021
When Bella, a 7-year-old Thoroughbred maiden mare, went into labor last month, her owners Tom and Nicole Bachman were excited and sprang into action. But they soon realized something was terribly wrong.

First Year of Equine PET Scans at Santa Anita is Success

December 22, 2020
One year ago, on December 12, 2019, Santa Anita Park installed the world’s first MILE-PET device, a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner specifically designed to image standing racehorses. This installation, one of several measures to reduce breakdowns at the racetrack, received a lot of attention at a time when Santa Anita was just coming out of a challenging racing season, with a cluster of horse fatalities early in the year.

Burned Alpacas Hospitalized for Four Months Finally Go Home

December 08, 2020

Average stay in the hospital for the more than 50,000 animals that UC Davis treats every year is less than a week. It is a rare occurrence for an animal to be hospitalized for four months, but two alpacas that the UC Davis veterinary hospital’s Large Animal Clinic treated this fall did just that. Apple Jack and Jasper became household names at the hospital, being seen by nearly every fourth-year veterinary student who had a large animal rotation. The students and technicians even decorated their barn stall for the holidays.

Equine Reproduction Service Updates Facilities at the Center for Equine Health

December 01, 2020
The UC Davis veterinary hospital’s Equine Reproduction Service has a newly renovated clinical teaching and research space at the school’s Center for Equine Health. Dean Michael Lairmore, Executive Associate Dean John Pascoe, and Executive Assistant Dean Mary McNally officially unveiled the newly renovated space, which includes four custom-designed stocks and all new flooring. The Equine Reproduction Service team, led by Service Chief Dr. Ghislaine Dujovne and newly acquired faculty member Dr. Pouya Dini, also has a new student meeting space and expanded laboratory as part of the renovation.

New Procedure More Efficient for Ovariohysterectomy on Horse

October 29, 2020
Georgia, an 18-year-old warmblood mare, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital after a recent change of ownership. The previous owners disclosed she had been treated medically for chronic endometritis (inflammation of the uterine lining) over the past several years without resolution of the condition.

UC Davis Cares for 1,000 Animals from Wildfires

August 28, 2020
Since August 19, the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine has been treating animals burned in the devastating LNU Lightning Complex Fire. Using a field-first approach, the school's Veterinary Emergency Response Team (VERT) deployed to Solano and Sonoma Counties to care for animals at evacuation centers and those sheltering in place on ranches. They also conducted search and rescue missions throughout the fire zones. Meanwhile, the veterinary hospital has been able to concentrate on only the most critical cases.

Wildfires: The University Responds

August 28, 2020
Faculty, staff, and students from the School of Veterinary Medicine have responded to the LNU Lightning Complex Fire with a swift deployment of the Veterinary Emergency Response Team in the field and the Disaster Response Committee at the veterinary hospital.

Swift Care Saves Newborn Calves from Deadly Infections

July 23, 2020
The Schuler Ranch in Yuba City is a small beef cattle operation with about 25 head of shorthorns. The 2020 calving season started out as normal as any calving season of the past, with four healthy calves being born, including a set of twins. When the next group of cows calved, five of their newborns became ill at the same time. It was clear that something devastating could be going through their small herd and could wipe it out quickly. After onsite veterinary services could not save one of the sick calves, they rushed the four others to the Large Animal Clinic (LAC) at the UC Davis veterinary hospital.

Equine PET Scanner Making Big Strides at Santa Anita Park

July 01, 2020
The equine Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner pioneered by the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, in collaboration with LONGMILE Veterinary Imaging, is now in heavy use at Santa Anita Park in Southern California. In just over six months since the installation in December 2019, with the financial support from the Stronach Group, more than 100 scans have been performed with the “MILEPET” (Molecular Imaging of Limbs in Equids), the PET scanner specifically designed to acquire images on horses without the need to lay them down.

Equine Residents Win Orthopedic Research Awards

June 18, 2020
Drs. Jannah Pye and Tom Cullen, equine surgery residents at the UC Davis veterinary hospital, were recently awarded the Mark S. Bloomberg Memorial Resident Research Award by the Veterinary Orthopedic Society (VOS). The two were among a handful of residents throughout the country award the prize. They were recognized in February at the VOS Annual Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho, before the COVID-19 pandemic caused all veterinary conferences to cease in-person activities.

Three Equine Specialties (and a Dedicated Family) Come Together to Heal Horse

April 28, 2020
Cooper, a 16-year-old quarter horse gelding, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital after his owner, Robyn Armstrong, noticed spooking behavior over the past few months. Her normally friendly horse was not letting her near him. The hospital’s ophthalmologists noticed an obstruction in Cooper’s vision, but also noticed an unrelated abnormality on his face. The two separate conditions initially concerned Armstrong and set Cooper back a few months, but ultimately, he emerged a much healthier, happier horse.