veterinary hospital

California Rises From the Ashes Again

January 16, 2019
In recent years, UC-Davis veterinary faculty and students have been on the front lines for various fires throughout the state, and this year was no different. In fact, the university closed its campus from Nov. 13-15, 2018, because of poor air quality as a result of the Camp Fire, but the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital remained open. In all, faculty and students at the hospital treated about 70 animals, including pigs, goats, sheep, horses, a donkey, cats, and a llama.

How Cannabis Litter Can Attract and Harm Animals

January 16, 2019
The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital is seeing an increasing number of cannabinoid intoxication since legalization. Animals find it on trails and in parks without their humans realizing it. Some dogs and cats need nothing more than extra comforting and fluids to counteract the effects, but others require additional medical intervention

300 Blind Mice Uncover Genetic Causes of Eye Disease

January 03, 2019
Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human eye vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients. The work is published Dec. 21 in Nature Communications Biology. The research team was led by Dr. Bret Moore, resident at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

Dogs, Cats Rescued From California Camp Fire Heal With Fish Skins

January 03, 2019
Several burned dogs and cats at the VCA Valley Oak Veterinary Center in Chico are getting an unusual treatment to help them heal from injuries they suffered in the Camp Fire: fish skins. This is the first time sterilized tilapia skins have been used to treat burns on dogs and cats.

UC Davis Responds to the Camp Fire—One Animal at a Time

December 21, 2018
In the aftermath of California's deadliest wildfire in November, the UC Davis veterinary hospital as well as the Veterinary Emergency Response Team (VERT) launched into action. Nearly 70 animals were brought to UC Davis for treatment while hundreds of others were evaluated and treated in the field by VERT. This was a comprehensive team effort, comprised of faculty, veterinary technicians, students and staff.

Harnessing Hope and Healing

August 29, 2018
For more than 50 years, Michael Muir (yes, the great-grandson of conservationist John Muir) has been breeding horses with the help of the UC Davis veterinary hospital’s Equine Field Service and Equine Reproduction Service. His unique breed of the Stonewall Sporthorse wins national and international competitions--as well as the hearts of those who find a new lease on life from the therapy they provide.

Field Service Treats Retired Police Horse

August 21, 2018
Have you ever wondered where police horses end up when they retire? Most are adopted out to private sanctuaries or rescue organizations, often times being visited by their former partners. The T.S. & K.D. Glide Foundation on the outskirts of Davis houses eight of them.

Medical Management of Deep Ulcerative Keratitis

August 04, 2018
Researchers at the University of California, Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital recently performed a study to determine if intensive medical management offered a viable treatment alternative to surgery for feline patients with severe deep ulcerative keratitis.

UC Davis Investigates Link Between Dog Diets and Deadly Heart Disease

July 19, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently issued an alert about reports of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs eating certain pet foods containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds, or potatoes as main ingredients. UC Davis is leading the investigation between these dog diets and heart disease.

Building Research Teams of the Future

July 06, 2018

The latest newsletter from the UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center highlights collaborations among researchers from human and veterinary medicine. Articles include how clinical trials with animal patients speeds translation to improved care for people, partnerships in human-animal eye research, and new hope from novel canine cancer therapy treatments and feline stem cell therapy for an oral inflammatory disease. Read more