agriculture

CAHFS Faculty Honored Distinguished Awards for Protecting Food and Animal Health

October 31, 2019

by Caitlin Khorey, Communications intern

Congratulations are due to Drs. Beate Crossley and Francisco Uzal who were recently honored with distinguished awards at the annual meeting of American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) and the United States Animal Health Association (USAHA). Crossley and Uzal are both faculty members with the school’s California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (CAHFS). 

Innovating Dairy Digester Research

October 23, 2019
Dr. Pramod Pandey, a faculty member and cooperative extension specialist at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, focuses on better ways to manage dairy waste material for both large and small farms.

How to Assess and Manage Wildlife Intrusion Risk on Your Farm

September 10, 2019
To protect the public from foodborne illness, vegetable growers must identify and manage against possible environmental sources of contamination — such as intrusion and defecation by wild animals — to ensure public health concerns remain minimal.

A New App Helps Estimate Herd Prevalence of Bovine Respiratory Disease

June 12, 2019
Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most significant illnesses impacting the health of pre-weaned calves. It’s the #2 killer of pre-weaned calves and of particular interest to dairy farmers in California, the nation’s #1 milk producer. Producers now have a new diagnostic tool in hand—a phone app that leads them through a scoring system for BRD—that aims to improve the health of pre-weaned calves on California dairies.

Healthy Chickens Create Healthy Communities

October 10, 2018
Dr. Rodrigo Gallardo may be a poultry medicine specialist who helps improve the wellbeing of chickens through research and education, but he also sees the far-reaching impact of his role. “By helping villages in other parts of the world maintain healthier poultry flocks, we’re assisting communities as a whole,” Gallardo explained. “If families can increase egg and meat production in their chickens because they are healthier, they have more financial resources to spend on health care and sending their children to school.”