internal medicine

UC Davis Veterinarians Successfully Treat K9 Officer’s Mysterious Illness

June 07, 2019
Aero, a 7-year-old German shepherd-Belgian Malinois mix, is back in action with the Anderson (CA) Police Department as a narcotics-detecting K9 officer. Four years ago, however, he was forced to prematurely retire after a mysterious illness caused his energy levels to plummet and his muscles to atrophy. His handler, Officer Mike Hallagran, did not think Aero would survive.

Oral Magnesium and Boron Found to Reduce Headshaking in Horses

April 23, 2019
Giving magnesium and boron can benefit headshaking horses, the findings of research suggest. Trigeminal‐mediated headshaking, which used to be called idiopathic headshaking, is caused by a low threshold of firing of the trigeminal nerve in the face. In most cases, the condition is worse during spring and summer, and geldings are over-represented. Various treatments have been tried, including face masks with ultraviolet light protection, nose nets, nutritional supplements, antihistamines, corticosteroids, neuromodulation, and even surgery on the nerve. Results have been variable.

UC Davis Veterinarian Discovers Rare Blood Disorder in Cat

August 20, 2018
Miao Miao, a 4-year-old male domestic shorthair cat, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital with persistent nosebleeds. Based on previous medical issues, his owners were aware that he had some variation of a blood platelet disorder (causing an inability to properly clot blood), but the exact make-up of that was never discovered.

Blood Purification Process Saves Anemic Dog

February 01, 2017

Bella, a 5-year-old female pit bull terrier, was acting lethargic a few months ago and then produced dark urine and was icteric (jaundice-like). Her owner Carol, a veterinarian and UC Davis alum, knew something was wrong and ran blood tests on Bella. The tests indicated extremely low red blood cell (RBC) counts, and Carol suspected a case of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA). IMHA can be a fatal disease, as it causes a dog’s immune system to destroy its own RBCs (which carry oxygen to the cells and pick up carbon dioxide).