neurology

Oral Magnesium and Boron Found to Reduce Headshaking in Horses

April 23, 2019
Giving magnesium and boron can benefit headshaking horses, the findings of research suggest. Trigeminal‐mediated headshaking, which used to be called idiopathic headshaking, is caused by a low threshold of firing of the trigeminal nerve in the face. In most cases, the condition is worse during spring and summer, and geldings are over-represented. Various treatments have been tried, including face masks with ultraviolet light protection, nose nets, nutritional supplements, antihistamines, corticosteroids, neuromodulation, and even surgery on the nerve. Results have been variable.

Surgery for Disc Disease Helps Return Dog to Mobility

August 21, 2018
Roxie, a 12-year-old female Shih Tzu, was having trouble moving her hind legs, to the point of becoming partially paralyzed. After being referred to the Neurology/Neurosurgery Service at the UC Davis veterinary hospital, an evaluation of Roxie showed her to have an arched posture, avoided moving her neck, and had some incoordination in her hind legs.

News!

April 09, 2018

Max, 7-year-old Saint Bernard, started having issues getting up and walking. It was clearly more than just a dog getting older, so his owners Joe and Kris Schratz took him to their primary veterinarian who administered therapy treatments in hopes of improving his condition. When Max’s limbs started getting progressively weaker, the veterinarian recommended taking him to the UC Davis veterinary hospital.

Paralyzed Cat Defies Odds and Walks Again Thanks to UC Davis Neurosurgeons

January 01, 2017

Gray, a 9-month-old male cat, was found as a stray in Hawaii and taken in by his new owner. Shortly after settling in with his new family, Gray’s posture became abnormal and his hind limbs splayed outward, severely affecting his ability to walk. He was painful to the touch, and over the next few days, became increasingly immobile. Radiographs taken by a local veterinarian indicated a vertebral disc space narrowing in Gray’s lower back. Within a few days, he was no longer able to walk at all, so his owner researched where to get the best help for Gray. They were soon on their way to California to see neurologists at the UC Davis veterinary hospital.