neurology

Dog Enjoys Family Vacation After Cancer Treatments

Bubbles, a 10-year-old male boxer, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital’s Emergency Room following an inability to maintain his coordination accompanied with weakness in his hind limbs. Critical care specialists in the ER referred him to the Neurology/Neurosurgery Service for further evaluation. Following examination and an MRI, a tumor on Bubbles’ spinal cord was discovered.

UC Davis Aids Long-Serving K-9 Officer

Wildlife Officer Paul Cardoza, a game warden with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), refers to his partner, K-9 Kilo, as his most trusted piece of equipment. The pair have been together for 11 years. So, when Kilo, a 13-year-old male German shepherd/Belgian Malinois mix, was having trouble walking and supporting himself on his hind limbs, Cardoza sought out the specialists at the UC Davis veterinary hospital.

Neurosurgery and a Dedicated Owner Help Paralyzed Dog Walk Again

Goldie, 14-year-old female spayed rat terrier, was living the good life on a horse farm with plenty of open land to run free. Her owner, Renee Johnson, describes her as full of vigor, rambunctious, and enthusiastic, with too much energy for city life in a small yard. Her duties as a barn dog kept her busy minding the 14 horses in her guard, not being afraid to bark orders when the horses were out of line or misbehaving. Unfortunately, that comfortableness around the horses got her in trouble, getting severely injured when one of them accidentally stepped on or kicked her.

Surgeons Help Acutely Paralyzed Dog Walk Again

Dog owner Rob Beasom and his wife were out of town when they received a frantic call from their dog sitter. Barley, their 3-year-old male French bulldog, severely hurt himself while jumping off the couch, rendering him paralyzed in his back legs. Beasom immediately made plans to return home and called Barley’s primary veterinarian. After Beasom described the situation, the veterinarian told him to take Barley to the UC Davis veterinary hospital.

Oral Magnesium and Boron Found to Reduce Headshaking in Horses

Giving magnesium and boron can benefit headshaking horses, the findings of research suggest. Trigeminal‐mediated headshaking, which used to be called idiopathic headshaking, is caused by a low threshold of firing of the trigeminal nerve in the face. In most cases, the condition is worse during spring and summer, and geldings are over-represented. Various treatments have been tried, including face masks with ultraviolet light protection, nose nets, nutritional supplements, antihistamines, corticosteroids, neuromodulation, and even surgery on the nerve. Results have been variable.

Surgery for Disc Disease Helps Return Dog to Mobility

Roxie, a 12-year-old female Shih Tzu, was having trouble moving her hind legs, to the point of becoming partially paralyzed. After being referred to the Neurology/Neurosurgery Service at the UC Davis veterinary hospital, an evaluation of Roxie showed her to have an arched posture, avoided moving her neck, and had some incoordination in her hind legs.

Veterinarians and Physicians Team Up to Treat Brain Malformation in Dog

Crash, a 6-year-old male German shepherd, was starting to tire more easily on his walks and seemed “spacey” and listless. An MRI revealed an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM)-more commonly seen in humans-located within the brain and behind his eyes. Veterinary neurosurgeons collaborated with human specialists to treat his condition.

UC Davis Neurosurgeons Successfully Remove Brain Tumor, Extending Dog’s Life

Dazzy, a 4-year-old male French bulldog, began having seizures and acting aggressive toward strangers – a behavior he had never previously displayed. His owners took him to see their primary veterinarian who ultimately referred them to a neurologist near their home in Southern California. An MRI performed by the neurologist revealed a left intra-axial cerebral mass, most consistent with a glioma (brain tumor).

Dog Recovers after Long Rehabilitation at UC Davis

Max, 7-year-old Saint Bernard, started having issues getting up and walking. It was clearly more than just a dog getting older, so his owners Joe and Kris Schratz took him to their primary veterinarian who administered therapy treatments in hopes of improving his condition. When Max’s limbs started getting progressively weaker, the veterinarian recommended taking him to the UC Davis veterinary hospital.