UC Davis Cares for 1,000 Animals from Wildfires

August 28, 2020
Since August 19, the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine has been treating animals burned in the devastating LNU Lightning Complex Fire. Using a field-first approach, the school's Veterinary Emergency Response Team (VERT) deployed to Solano and Sonoma Counties to care for animals at evacuation centers and those sheltering in place on ranches. They also conducted search and rescue missions throughout the fire zones. Meanwhile, the veterinary hospital has been able to concentrate on only the most critical cases.

Wildfires: The University Responds

August 28, 2020
Faculty, staff, and students from the School of Veterinary Medicine have responded to the LNU Lightning Complex Fire with a swift deployment of the Veterinary Emergency Response Team in the field and the Disaster Response Committee at the veterinary hospital.

VERT Team Honored by State for Camp Fire Response

June 18, 2019
Dr. Howard Backer, Director of the California Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), announced the recipients of the California Emergency Medical Services Camp Fire EMS Awards for 2019. The ceremony took place on June 17, 2019 from 1:45 – 4:00 pm at the Laxson Auditorium, California State University Chico. 

California Rises From the Ashes Again

January 16, 2019
In recent years, UC-Davis veterinary faculty and students have been on the front lines for various fires throughout the state, and this year was no different. In fact, the university closed its campus from Nov. 13-15, 2018, because of poor air quality as a result of the Camp Fire, but the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital remained open. In all, faculty and students at the hospital treated about 70 animals, including pigs, goats, sheep, horses, a donkey, cats, and a llama.

UC Davis Responds to the Camp Fire—One Animal at a Time

December 21, 2018
In the aftermath of California's deadliest wildfire in November, the UC Davis veterinary hospital as well as the Veterinary Emergency Response Team (VERT) launched into action. Nearly 70 animals were brought to UC Davis for treatment while hundreds of others were evaluated and treated in the field by VERT. This was a comprehensive team effort, comprised of faculty, veterinary technicians, students and staff.