UC Davis Researchers Race to Develop Coronavirus Solutions

March 25, 2020
Clinical pathologists, infectious disease physicians and scientists at the UC Davis Medical Center, School of Medicine, California National Primate Research Center and Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases (a unique partnership between the Schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine) are collaborating on new reagents, diagnostic tests and a vaccine for the COVID-19 coronavirus. Their goal is to unravel the biology and infectious pathology of this new virus, and to develop means for prevention and ultimately treatment. 

Celebrating National One Health Awareness Month in January

January 10, 2020
As we start a new decade, the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine is participating in a national campaign to promote the value of One Health, a collaborative approach to finding new solutions that benefit animal, human and environmental health.

Rectal Microbes Influence Effectiveness of HIV Vaccine

December 13, 2019
Microbes living in the rectum could make a difference to the effectiveness of experimental HIV vaccines, according to research led by Smita Iyer, assistant professor at the UC Davis Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases and School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Peter Havel Honored with 2020 AAVMC Excellence in Research Award

December 09, 2019
The AAVMC announced today the recipients of five awards that recognize professional excellence, achievement and service in academic veterinary medicine. Dr. Peter J. Havel from the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine is the recipient of the 2020 AAVMC Excellence in Research Award.

Professor Nicole Baumgarth Elected as AAAS Fellow

December 03, 2019
Professor Nicole Baumgarth of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, was one of 10 UC Davis professors recently elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Mapping the Pathway to Gut Health in HIV and SIV Infections

November 20, 2019
Katti (Horng) Crakes, doctoral student in the schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis, served as first author on a UC Davis research study that found that the damaged gut lining (known as leaky gut) in monkeys infected with chronic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an HIV-like virus, was rapidly repaired within five hours of receiving Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria. The outcome lends hope that leaky gut, a common condition among HIV patients, could be effectively treated in the future.