ophthalmology

Collaborative Effort Helps Dog See Again

June 04, 2019
Bobby, a 12-year-old male miniature Schnauzer, developed cataracts in both eyes, presumably brought on by his diabetes. While he could still sense light in his eyes, the cataracts clouded his vision to the point of essential blindness. Navigation of his home was accomplished by memory and by utilizing a heightened sense of feel, especially on the staircase. His owner, John Yeung, was eager to have Bobby’s vision restored, so he sought out the help of UC Davis alum and former ophthalmology resident Dr. Kristina Burling, a board-certified ophthalmologist. Since 1994, Dr. Burling has owned and operated Animal Eye Specialists in Campbell, California near Yeung’s home in San Jose. Dr. Burling successfully performed cataract surgery on Bobby’s left eye. However, the cataract removal on his right eye had to be abruptly stopped mid-surgery due to an underlying systemic disease that caused Bobby’s heart rate to fall dangerously low. Dr. Burling made the smart decision to stop the surgery, as Bobby was no longer in a healthy enough position to proceed. That's when UC Davis stepped in to help.

Improving Animal Vision

June 03, 2019
It’s fitting that Dr. Sara Thomasy is an ophthalmologist. Her eyes light up when she talks about the breakthroughs being made at UC Davis thanks to recent acquisitions of state-of-the-art imaging equipment. Eight new pieces of imaging equipment and one new piece of laboratory technology, made possible by grants from the Center for Companion Animal Health, now allow the Ophthalmology Service to provide new levels of care.

UC Davis Ophthalmologists Save Dog’s Eyes Following Accident

April 02, 2019
Rally, a 1-year-old female Labrador retriever, was accidentally shot while on a hunting excursion, with both of her eyes sustaining major trauma. She was referred her to the Ophthalmology Service at the UC Davis veterinary hospital who helped save her vision.

300 Blind Mice Uncover Genetic Causes of Eye Disease

January 03, 2019
Hundreds of new genes linked to blindness and other vision disorders have been identified in a screen of mouse strains. Many of these genes are likely important in human eye vision and the results could help identify new causes of hereditary blindness in patients. The work is published Dec. 21 in Nature Communications Biology. The research team was led by Dr. Bret Moore, resident at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

Medical Management of Deep Ulcerative Keratitis

August 04, 2018
Researchers at the University of California, Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital recently performed a study to determine if intensive medical management offered a viable treatment alternative to surgery for feline patients with severe deep ulcerative keratitis.

Anonymous Donor Pays for Shelter Dog’s Cataract Surgery

January 08, 2018

Bentley, an approximately 6-year-old male Maltese mix, was brought to the UC Davis veterinary hospital by the Underdog Animal Rescue after they saved him from a potentially non-adoptive situation (and facing euthanasia) at a county shelter. While at the shelter, Bentley was diagnosed with cataracts in both eyes by the county’s veterinarian. His foster mom reported he was able to see shadows and get around the house reasonably well, but would occasionally bump into things if the furniture was moved or things were out of place. She also believed him to be deaf, as he has never responded to his name or any type of noise. To improve Bentley’s quality of life and to give him the best chance for adoption, she decided to bring him to the ophthalmology specialists at UC Davis.

UC Davis Saves Dog’s Eye after Stick Pokes Socket

September 01, 2017

Arrow, a 2-year-old male Dachshund mix, was playing in his family’s back yard when his owners, Deborah and George Smith, heard a crying yelp. Upon investigating, they found him standing still in the yard with a 3-inch twig protruding from his right eye socket. They immediately brought him to the nearest veterinary emergency room where veterinarians sedated him, and told the Smiths they needed to bring Arrow to the ophthalmology specialists at the UC Davis veterinary hospital if there was any chance of saving his eye.