Dogs

UC Davis Veterinarians Successfully Treat K9 Officer’s Mysterious Illness

June 07, 2019
Aero, a 7-year-old German shepherd-Belgian Malinois mix, is back in action with the Anderson (CA) Police Department as a narcotics-detecting K9 officer. Four years ago, however, he was forced to prematurely retire after a mysterious illness caused his energy levels to plummet and his muscles to atrophy. His handler, Officer Mike Hallagran, did not think Aero would survive.

Collaborative Effort Helps Dog See Again

June 04, 2019
Bobby, a 12-year-old male miniature Schnauzer, developed cataracts in both eyes, presumably brought on by his diabetes. While he could still sense light in his eyes, the cataracts clouded his vision to the point of essential blindness. Navigation of his home was accomplished by memory and by utilizing a heightened sense of feel, especially on the staircase. His owner, John Yeung, was eager to have Bobby’s vision restored, so he sought out the help of UC Davis alum and former ophthalmology resident Dr. Kristina Burling, a board-certified ophthalmologist. Since 1994, Dr. Burling has owned and operated Animal Eye Specialists in Campbell, California near Yeung’s home in San Jose. Dr. Burling successfully performed cataract surgery on Bobby’s left eye. However, the cataract removal on his right eye had to be abruptly stopped mid-surgery due to an underlying systemic disease that caused Bobby’s heart rate to fall dangerously low. Dr. Burling made the smart decision to stop the surgery, as Bobby was no longer in a healthy enough position to proceed. That's when UC Davis stepped in to help.

Improving Animal Vision

June 03, 2019
It’s fitting that Dr. Sara Thomasy is an ophthalmologist. Her eyes light up when she talks about the breakthroughs being made at UC Davis thanks to recent acquisitions of state-of-the-art imaging equipment. Eight new pieces of imaging equipment and one new piece of laboratory technology, made possible by grants from the Center for Companion Animal Health, now allow the Ophthalmology Service to provide new levels of care.

Study Finds Spike in Deadly Heart Disease Linked To Trendy Dog Diets

January 30, 2019
UC Davis veterinarians led a team that has found a link between some popular grain-free, legume-rich dog diets and a type of nutritional deficiency and canine heart disease known as taurine-deficient dilated cardiomyopathy. The study was recently published in the journal PLOS ONE.

A Bulldog's Screw Tail Might Help Us Understand a Rare Genetic Disease in People

January 16, 2019
One of the most distinctive body parts of your typical English bulldog, French bulldog, or Boston terrier—their coiled screw tail—might be caused by a specific genetic mutation, suggests recent research. And more importantly for humans, that same genetic quirk might help scientists better understand a rare disorder in people.

How Cannabis Litter Can Attract and Harm Animals

January 16, 2019
The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital is seeing an increasing number of cannabinoid intoxication since legalization. Animals find it on trails and in parks without their humans realizing it. Some dogs and cats need nothing more than extra comforting and fluids to counteract the effects, but others require additional medical intervention

Senior Dogs Can Suffer from Dementia Just Like People Do; Find Out If Your Older Pup Needs Help

January 16, 2019
Growing older can be tough – and that goes for all species. When it comes to age-related illnesses, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are some of the most notorious and least understood human afflictions. If you’ve noticed your senior dog has been increasingly irritable and disoriented, having sleep troubles (including sleeping all day) or having frequent accidents inside the house, he or she may be suffering from a disease that manifests very similarly to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in people.

UC Davis Veterinary Orthopedic Surgeons Regrow Dog’s Leg Bone

November 05, 2018
A UC Davis veterinary patient is being described as a miracle by her owner. When Ethel, a 2-year-old Yorkshire terrier, was rescued by MaryAnn Lawson, the rambunctious pup was in a cast for a broken leg. Unfortunately, two previous surgeries failed to properly heal her broken right ulna and radius (equivalent to both bones in a human’s forearm). Lawson forged on and consulted with other veterinary orthopedic surgeons, all of whom recommended amputating the leg.

Dog Adapts to Tongue Amputation after Accident with Toy

September 19, 2018
Arai, a 5-year-old female pit bull terrier, loves to chew on balls. Her owners describe her as a “100 percent ball dog.” So when she had a ball in her mouth for a few hours, they didn’t think much was out of the ordinary. When Arai wouldn’t drop the ball when it was time to eat, however, they knew something was wrong.