News

Latest News

Health Advances for Labrador Retrievers

April 11, 2018

 Dr. Jonathan Dear talks with Just Labs magazine about health advances for Labrador retrievers, in particular copper storage disease. If detected early, veterinarian teams can work with owners to manage it.

Dog Recovers after Long Rehabilitation at UC Davis

April 09, 2018

Max, 7-year-old Saint Bernard, started having issues getting up and walking. It was clearly more than just a dog getting older, so his owners Joe and Kris Schratz took him to their primary veterinarian who administered therapy treatments in hopes of improving his condition. When Max’s limbs started getting progressively weaker, the veterinarian recommended taking him to the UC Davis veterinary hospital.

A Veterinary Scientist's Success Story

April 09, 2018

Dr. Finno, who holds both D.V.M. and Ph.D. degrees, describes what being a veterinary scientist means to her. Her commitment to research is apparent in her academic accomplishments, which have been recognized nationally and internationally. She has received several prestigious awards for her outstanding contributions to advancing translational equine research.

UC Davis Ophthalmologists Perform Emergency Surgery on K-9 Officer

April 06, 2018

K-9 Officer Blitz, a 5-year-old German shepherd/Belgian Malinois mix with the Sanger Police Department, was performing routine training exercises with his handler and partner Corporal Brandon Coles when tragedy struck. While retrieving an item from under a car, Blitz caught his eye socket on the tailpipe, causing extensive damage. As Blitz bled profusely from around his right eye, Coles rushed him to a local veterinary clinic.

Wild Horses Living on the Channel Islands Face an Uncertain Future on the Mainland

April 06, 2018

The Santa Cruz Island horses were removed from the Channel Islands in the early 2000s. The horses had been there for more than a century, living relics from the time of the conquistadors, evolving to become as unique as the island itself. But after years of surviving in isolation on the island, the breed is teetering on the brink of extinction here on the mainland.

News!

April 06, 2018

In the 1980s, poaching and disease decimated mountain gorilla populations. They might have gone extinct, were it not for a group of dedicated conservationists, including wildlife veterinarians, who stepped up to help.

UC President Napolitano Visits Vet Med

April 05, 2018

On Thursday, April 5th the School of Veterinary Medicine welcomed University of California President Janet Napolitano for a visit and tour. It was a special honor for the school’s leadership team to update President Napolitano on program priorities and activities in support of animal, human and environmental health. 

News!

April 04, 2018

Veterinarians at UC Davis have put out a call for eggs from California’s backyard chicken owners, particularly those living near the Thomas Fire and other recent blazes. They want to test the eggs for free in an effort to understand how they might be affected by wildfires, lead and other environmental factors.

News!

April 04, 2018

Dr. Sue Stover participated in a panel discussing the appropriateness of bisphosphonate use in race horses, especially in young horses, during the animal welfare forum at the Association of Racing Commissioners International conference on equine welfare and racing integrity.

Cardiologists Discuss One Health Approaches to Heart Disease

March 30, 2018

UC Davis continues to lead the way in a growing approach to medicine called One Health. Understanding that the health of humans, animals and the environment are all connected and may hold discoveries for each other is the foundation of One Health. A cornerstone of that approach is studying the diseases animals and humans share. One of those is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heart disease that results in thickening of the walls of the heart ventricles, interfering with the flow of blood, and leading to sometimes fatal consequences. The condition can be difficult to study in humans due to its low rate of occurrence (about 1 in 500). However, veterinarians are proving to be a much welcomed addition to that research, for they see a condition that almost exactly resembles human HCM in approximately 10 percent of cats.

House Officers Showcase Research Projects

March 30, 2018

UC Davis veterinary hospital house officers (interns, fellows, residents) presented their research studies at the 40th Annual Gerald V. Ling House Officer Seminar Day. The day-long event featured short presentations to fellow house officers, faculty, staff, students and guests.

Faculty Spotlight – Ronald Li, DVM, MVetMed, PhD, DACVECC

March 30, 2018

Dr. Ronald Li recently joined the Emergency and Critical Care Service as an assistant professor. He graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College (University of Guelph) in 2009 and completed a rotating internship in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Li then went on to pursue an emergency and critical care residency and a Master of Veterinary Medicine degree at the Royal Veterinary College in 2011. He became a Diplomate of American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care in 2014. Dr. Li received his Ph.D. from UC Davis in December 2017

Resident Spotlight – Jenna Winer, DVM

March 30, 2018

Dr. Jenna Winer is a third-year resident in the Dentistry & Oral Surgery Service. She earned her veterinary degree from UC Davis in 2014. Dr. Winer then returned home to complete a rotating small animal internship at the Animal Specialty and Emergency Center (ASEC), a private practice in Los Angeles. She developed an interest in dentistry when she published a manuscript on sea otter dental pathology during her third year of veterinary school. Her special interests include dentistry of wildlife/zoo species and maxillofacial surgery.

Foxtails Pose Serious Health Risks to Animals

March 30, 2018

Foxtails—a type of seed cluster found in a small group of weed plants—are commonly found in Northern California, including foxtail grasses, barley and millets. While these weeds may seem harmless, animal owners should be vigilant to keep their pets away from plant awns. Covered with microscopic projections, foxtails can pose severe health risks to animals, as they migrate into tissue causing abscesses and widespread infections. The physical make-up of the foxtail stops it from reversing direction and exiting the body. The most common access points foxtails utilize to enter the body are through the nose, mouth and ears, but they can also penetrate the skin causing wounds and subcutaneous abscesses.

Foaling Services Available at Large Animal Clinic

March 30, 2018

Foaling season is upon us. The hospital’s Large Animal Clinic can assist with a number of foaling options. UC Davis equine specialists provide a full range of foaling services with the highest quality of care anywhere in Northern California. Whether it is for high-risk pregnancies or pregnancies anticipated to be normal, the hospital can keep a watchful eye on expecting mares to give owners peace of mind.